Psychology and Child Development

Catalog Home

Faculty Office Bldg. (47), Room 24
Phone: 805.756.2033
https://psycd.calpoly.edu

Department Chair: Jasna Jovanovic

Academic Programs

Program name Program type
Child DevelopmentBS, Minor
GerontologyMinor
PsychologyBS, MS, Minor

The department consists of faculty with degrees in psychology, family studies, human development and education who direct programs leading to BS Child Development, BS Psychology, MS Psychology, and minors in Child Development, Psychology and Gerontology.

In addition, courses are offered which fulfill general education requirements, support other programs and serve as a personal development resource for all university students. These courses are designed to acquaint students with the facts, theories and contemporary trends in psychology and child development and how these principles can be incorporated into a more meaningful understanding of oneself and of one's interactions with others. The department supports the concept of international education and encourages students to investigate opportunities for overseas study. For further information, see the Study Abroad programs.

Undergraduate Programs

BS Child Development

The Child Development major is designed for students who are interested in professions involving children and adolescents in a variety of settings. The major provides the scientific base for understanding development from birth through emerging adulthood. The program emphasizes the ecological contexts in which development occurs, including family, school, technology, community, and culture. Graduates often continue studies in graduate and credential programs, and pursue a range of careers in education, intervention programs, and human services. 

The Child Development major is designed to enable students to develop a program of study suited to their individual needs and become part of a learning community of faculty and students. After completing core courses in child and adolescent development, they will develop a personal program of study by selecting electives, two internships, and a senior project. Each student graduates with a BS in Child Development.

Goals of the Child Development major are for students to:

  • Learn about theories and research that have helped us to understand how children and adolescents develop physically, emotionally, socially, and intellectually.
  • Study how children and youth affect and are affected by the formal and informal environments in which they grow.
  • Gain experience working with children and youth of different ages and backgrounds in various settings.
  • Develop expertise in the use of digital technologies to access, create, and disseminate information related to the learning and development of children and youth.
  • Develop an understanding of multicultural and anti-discrimination issues and how to lead children and youth into an appreciation of diversity.
  • Develop skills in research, leadership, effective communication, and community building.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

BS Psychology

The Psychology major offers a broad preparation in the science of psychology. Theoretical approaches, research techniques, laboratory experiences and internships are hallmarks of the psychology program.

Graduates often pursue careers in mental health programs, social services agencies, public health settings, education institutions, and personnel-related settings. Many majors go on to graduate work in such fields of psychology as: counseling, developmental, family, social, clinical or experimental.

Students may pursue a course of study which meets their individual needs and interests. Electives are selected by the student with the advice of the student's academic advisor.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

Child Development Minor

The minor is designed to provide students a broad knowledge base in child and adolescent development. Biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development are examined in context (e.g., family, school, culture). The minor builds upon students' critical thinking skills by approaching child development as a scientific area of study. This minor complements one's background in majors such as Liberal Studies, Psychology, Kinesiology, or Recreation, Parks, Tourism and Administration. An application form must be approved by a Child Development Minor advisor.

Minor Requirements
 

Gerontology Minor and Certificate Program

The Gerontology minor/certificate program is an interdisciplinary set of courses that prepares students in various majors whose careers will be directly or indirectly related to gerontology. The certificate program also allows non-matriculated students to develop or upgrade their skills and knowledge for those interested or already working in the field of gerontology. Coursework includes the psychological, biological, and social aspects of aging; changing roles; stress-related problems; and an understanding of the impact of an aging population on social, economic, and political institutions. Among the requirements for admission to the program is a minimum GPA of 3.00. All applicants are reviewed by the program coordinator.

Minor Requirements
 

Psychology Minor

The minor provides students with a broad background in the principles of psychology in order to develop an appreciation of the human element in the world around them, complement their professional training, and enhance their personal development and interpersonal effectiveness.

Students whose primary job responsibilities will require dealing with people should find employment opportunities increased and career advancement enhanced. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Psychology and Child Development Department for information and application forms. An application form must be approved by a Psychology Minor advisor. 

Minor Requirements

Graduate Program

MS in Psychology

General Characteristics

The Master of Science in Psychology is a 90-quarter unit professional degree program designed to provide the state of California with highly competent master-level clinicians who are academically prepared to obtain the marriage and family therapy (MFT) license. The program places a heavy emphasis on clinical skill training and applied experience that begins early in the program and culminates with an intensive supervised internship in a community mental health setting.

Admission to the Program

In addition to the general requirements of the University, specific requirements for admission to classified graduate standing are:

  • an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional association;
  • a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the last 90 quarter units (60 semester units) attempted;
  • satisfactory performance on the General Tests (Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); the GRE Advanced Test in Psychology is not required;
  • three letters of recommendation;
  • autobiographical information;

Related work or volunteer experience is highly desirable as is having received professional counseling.

Prerequisites

Coursework in abnormal psychology, lifespan theories, personality, introductory statistics, and research methods in psychology (or related discipline). Completion of these prerequisites is necessary for admission to the program.

Classified Standing

For admission as a classified graduate student, a student shall have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in the last 90 quarter units (60 semester units) attempted and shall have earned an acceptable baccalaureate degree from an institution accredited by a regional association. Additionally, the student must have satisfactorily met the professional, personal, scholastic, and other standards for graduate study, including qualifying examinations, as the appropriate university authorities may prescribe. Only those applicants who show promise of success and fitness are admitted, and only those who continue to demonstrate a satisfactory level of scholastic competence and who possess appropriate personal qualities are eligible to continue in the program.

Conditionally Classified Standing

The student may enroll in a graduate degree curriculum if in the opinion of the M.S. Program Committee the student can remedy any deficiencies by additional preparation.

Advancement to Candidacy

Advancement to master's degree candidacy requires completion of a minimum of 30 quarter units of required courses in residence, specified in a formal program of study, with a minimum grade point average of 3.0, fulfillment of the Graduation Writing Requirement, and the formal recommendation of the M.S. Program Committee. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all coursework completed subsequent to admission to the program.

Program of Study

The student must maintain a grade point average of 3.0 (B) or better in all courses taken subsequent to program admission. Calculation of the grade point average includes all grades, though only the units in courses with grades of A, B, or C are counted to satisfy requirements for the degree. Required courses with a grade of D or F must be repeated.

All candidates must meet the current Graduation Writing Requirement.

Sixty-four quarter units must be completed in residence. Transfer credits are allowed if acceptable for master's degree credit at the offering institution and approved by the M.S. Program Committee.

The Master of Science degree in Psychology requires a culminating experience that includes either the completion of a thesis or passing a comprehensive exam. Each candidate must file a formal program of study by the end of the first quarter as a classified graduate student. The professional and personal growth of each graduate student is of major importance; consequently, candidates are encouraged to seek the experience of personal therapy. Students must be very aware of course prerequisites and check the catalog carefully to assure enrollment in required courses.

MFT Licensing

The Master of Science in Psychology is designed to meet the educational requirements for the Marriage and Family Therapist license (MFT) in the State of California. Students are advised to acquire and read the laws governing MFT licensure from the Board of Behavioral Science Examiners, 1625 North Market Blvd., Suite S-200, Sacramento, CA 95834. State documents must be filed by the applicant within 30 days of program graduation. See the program coordinator for the procedure required for application for this license. State documents must be filed by the applicant within 30 days of program graduation.

Grades

If a candidate for University recommendation for MFT licensure has more than one grade of C or lower among the courses to be verified for the Board of Behavioral Sciences, that form will not be approved by the Chief Academic Officer Designee of Cal Poly.

Practicum and Traineeship

Practicum and traineeship courses represent the student's demonstration of the clinical skills basic to marriage, family and child counseling. A student who receives a grade of NC in practicum or traineeship is on probation regarding continuation in the program. A second grade of NC disqualifies the student from the program and University recommendation for the license. Also, candidates may be disqualified from this program for academic-related actions judged by the M.S. Program Committee to reflect unethical and/or unprofessional conduct.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

How to Read Course Descriptions

CD Courses

CD 102. Orientation to the Child Development Major. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: CD majors only.

Introduction to the child development major, self-assessments, career opportunities, university and community resources, and the program at Cal Poly. 2 lectures.

CD 131. Observing and Interacting with Children. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Observation methods and guidance techniques for adults working with children in family, community, and educational settings. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

CD 200. Special Problems. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Supervised investigation, including a written report, of a topic chosen with prior approval of instructor. Total credit limited to 6 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

CD 207. Children's Learning and Development in Educational Settings. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; PSY 201 or PSY 202 or admission to the university with the intent to enter the MSTEP Program.

Study of theories and research about the development and learning of children and young adolescents within diverse backgrounds, and application to teaching in public school settings. Observations/interactions with children in school settings. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Participation in public schools requires mandated fingerprint clearance. Crosslisted as CD/EDUC 207.

CD 230. Preschool Laboratory. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: CD 131 and PSY 256.

Preliminary teaching experience with children in a preschool laboratory setting. Participant planning, execution and evaluation of age-appropriate activities. Observation is used as the basis for planning for the development of the whole child. 2 lecture, 2 laboratories.

CD 254. Family Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Introduction to research and theory on family relationships and behavior across the lifespan. Contextual influences, diversity of family forms, and topics such as love, mate selection, marital quality, parenting, gender, household work, divorce, and remarriage. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 254.

CD 256. Developmental Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Introduction to the scientific study of development with emphasis on the lifespan, from infancy to old age. Basic research and concepts in understanding social, emotional, cognitive, contextual, and diversity influences on development. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 256.

CD 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

CD 304. Infant and Toddler Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 256.

Human development from conception through the second year of life. Examination of theory and research in multiple domains of development. Consideration of environments and activities which enhance the emerging capabilities of infants and toddlers. 4 lectures.

CD 305. Early and Middle Childhood Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 256 or CD/EDUC 207.

In-depth study of theory and research on development in early and middle childhood, especially within physical, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. Consideration of case studies and current practices in light of theoretical perspectives and current research. 4 lectures.

CD 306. Adolescence. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 256 or CD/EDUC 207.

Psychological analysis of the years from prepubescence to young adulthood. Current research on behavior and development during adolescence with emphasis on physical, affective, cognitive, sociocultural, historical, family, peer and school aspects of life during the post-child, pre-adult years. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 306.

CD 329. Research Methods in Child Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: PSY 256, STAT 217.

Introduction to research methods in child development. Critically evaluating research literature, generating research questions, and conducting observations and interviews with children and adolescents. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

CD 330. Supervised Fieldwork Internship. 4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Psychology and Child Development majors only; CD 230, PSY 323, junior standing and consent of instructor.

Faculty supervised fieldwork experience. Role of professional apprentice is experienced and analyzed by each student. Credit/No Credit grading only.

CD 333. Research Internship. 4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: CD 230 and CD 329.

Faculty-supervised research experience on various topics related to child and adolescent development. Student apprenticeship with a department faculty member engaging in a research project. Credit/No Credit grading only.

CD 350. Developmental Issues in Education. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: CD/EDUC 207 or PSY 256.

Current issues and research concerning how children and youth develop and learn in school. Topics may include motivation, views of intelligence, teacher and student relations, constructivist learning environments, socioemotional learning, school climates, home-school connections. 4 lectures.

CD 351. Learning in Out-of-School Time. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: CD/PSY 256 or CD/EDUC 207.

How children and youth develop and learn in settings and activities outside of formal schooling, such as everyday family activities, informal learning institutions (e.g., museums), nature, and organized extracurricular activities. Research findings and theoretical perspectives on how activity in such settings supports development and learning. 4 lectures.

CD 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Supervised investigation, including a written report, of a topic chosen with prior approval of instructor. Total credit limited to 6 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

CD 401. Perspectives on Child and Adolescent Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: CD 304, CD 305, CD 306, CD 329 and senior standing.

Advanced study of theoretical perspectives and research on the development of children and adolescents and the implications for current practice and policy. 4 seminars.

CD 413. Children, Adolescents & Technology. 6 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: CD 305, CD 306, CD 329.

Examination of research and theory on how children and adolescents use digital technologies and influences on cognitive, social, and identity development. Observations of children's use of various digital technologies, and design of activities that use technology tools to support learning goals. 4 lectures, 2 laboratories.

CD 417. Interpersonal Relationships in Childhood and Adolescence. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: CD 304, CD 305 or CD 306; or PSY 256 and PSY 305.

Current theories and research on the development of interpersonal relationships in childhood and adolescence. Topics may include parent-child relationships, peer relationships in childhood, intimate relationships in adolescence. The Schedule of Classes will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 417.

CD 424. Children's Learning and Development in Diverse Families and Communities. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: Two of the following: CD 304, CD 305, CD 306; junior standing or consent of instructor.

Examination of research on child and adolescent learning and development in diverse families and community settings. Further study of ecological and sociocultural perspectives and cross-cultural research. 4 lectures.

CD 430. Advanced Supervised Fieldwork Internship. 4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: CD 330 and consent of instructor; Psychology and Child Development majors only.

Faculty-supervised preprofessional experience in a career-related setting which complements the CD 330 internship. Such roles as master teacher, caseworker, therapeutic intern, administrative aide or program specialist are experienced and analyzed by each student. Credit/No credit grading only.

CD 431. Assessing Children's Development and Environments. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: CD 304 or CD 305 or PSY 419 or PSY 420 or PSY 421; and CD 329 or PSY 329.

Current developmental and environmental assessments used in care and educational settings and in prevention programs and research. Practice using, creating, and evaluating child assessments. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 431.

CD 433. Advanced Research Internship. 4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: CD 333.

Faculty-supervised research experience on various topics related to child and adolescent development. Student apprenticeship with a department faculty member to conduct aspects of a research project. Credit/No Credit grading only.

CD 456. Behavioral Disorders in Childhood. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202, junior standing.

Applications of psychological principles to childhood behavioral disorders. Aggression, delinquency, stress reactions, motivational, perceptual-attentional deficiencies, psychoses, anxiety disorders, biological dysfunctions, and social, emotional and intellectual disabilities. 4 seminars. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 456.

CD 460. Child Abuse and Neglect. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202 and junior standing.

Issues in child maltreatment, including definitions and forms, causes, consequences, assessment, reporting, treatment, and prevention. Possible links among research, intervention, and public policy will be emphasized. 4 seminars. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 460.

CD 461. Senior Project Seminar. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: Completion of GWR and CD 329; Psychology and Child Development majors only.

Senior project expectations and skills. Students work alone or in groups to identify appropriate topics, methods and content for the senior project; to be presented in a series of progress reports. Begin literature reviews for completion in CD 462. 2 seminars.

CD 462. Senior Project. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: CD 461.

Completion of a project under faculty supervision.

CD 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1-4 lectures.

PSY Courses

PSY 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202 and consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, study or survey of selected problems in consultation and with prior approval of instructor. Written report required. Total credit limited to 4 units.

PSY 201. General Psychology. 4 units

GE Area D4

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Introduction to the psychological study of human beings. Applications and research in area such as psychobiology, perception, learning, motivation, consciousness, memory and cognition, personality, emotion, development, psychological assessment, social behavior, psychopathology and psychotherapy. A student may enroll for credit in either PSY 201 or PSY 202, but not both. Course may be offered in classroom-based or online format. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE D4.

PSY 202. General Psychology. 4 units

GE Area D4

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Introduction to the psychological study of human beings. Applications and research in area such as psychobiology, perception, learning, motivation, consciousness, memory and cognition, personality, emotion, development, psychological assessment, social behavior, psychopathology and psychotherapy. A student may enroll for credit in either PSY 201 or PSY 202, but not both. 3 lectures, 1 discussion. Fulfills GE D4.

PSY 212. Interpersonal Communication. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Area A2 with a grade of C- or better.

Introduction to the interaction process in two-person (dyadic) communication settings. Emphasis on the functions of varying messages in the initiation, development, maintenance and termination of personal and professional relationships. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as COMS/PSY 212.

PSY 251. Laboratory in Group Activities. 1-3 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Skills and techniques of solving problems in large and small groups. Conducting and reporting meetings. Analyses of leadership dynamics in campus organizations. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 6 units. 1-3 activities.

PSY 252. Social Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

How attitudes, beliefs, and behavior are affected by the social situation. Gender roles, prejudice, aggression, altruism, attitudes and persuasion, liking and loving, and group behavior. Use of social psychology to understand diversity issues, reduce racism and sexism and international conflict, improve relationships, and communicate persuasively. 4 lectures.

PSY 254. Family Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Introduction to research and theory on family relationships and behavior across the lifespan. Contextual influences, diversity of family forms, and topics such as love, mate selection, marital quality, parenting, gender, household work, divorce, and remarriage. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 254.

PSY 256. Developmental Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Introduction to the scientific study of development with emphasis on the lifespan, from infancy to old age. Basic research and concepts in understanding social, emotional, cognitive, contextual, and diversity influences on development. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 256.

PSY 260. African American Psychology. 4 units

USCP

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Recommended: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

A historical overview of African American psychology, and a critical examination of the psychocultural forces (e.g., history of slavery, racism, oppression, education, familial factors) that have helped to shape the beliefs, attitudes, identities, behavior, and well-being of African Americans.

PSY 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

PSY 301. Psychology of Personal Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Application of developmental psychology to self awareness. Includes communication skills, self modification skills and examination of life goals and values. 4 lectures.

PSY 302. Behavior in Organizations. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Characteristics of functioning organizations and their effects on individuals. Psychological issues relevant to the maintenance of the organization. Motivation, leadership, group phenomena, communication, decision-making, attitudes, personnel selection and organizational change. 4 lectures.

PSY 304. Intergroup Dialogues. 4 units

GE Area D5

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with a grade of C- or better; and completion of GE Area D1, D3, or D4. Recommended: Completion of USCP.

Weekly meetings of students from two distinct self-defined identity groups, with trained peer facilitators, in which readings, experiential activities, informed dialogue, and reflective writing are integrated as a means of encouraging self and group awareness and exploring ways to promote just community across difference. Supplemented by weekly lecture/discussions. 2 lectures, 2 discussions. Crosslisted as CRP/PSY 304. Fulfills GE D5 except for the following majors: City and Regional Planning, Child Development, and Psychology.

PSY 305. Personality. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Personality theories and research. Assessment, dynamics, and development of personality. Trait, behavioral, social learning, cognitive, humanistic, psychoanalytic and biological approaches. 4 lectures.

PSY 306. Adolescence. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 256 or CD/EDUC 207.

Psychological analysis of the years from prepubescence to young adulthood. Current research on behavior and development during adolescence with emphasis on physical, affective, cognitive, sociocultural, historical, family, peer and school aspects of life during the post-child, pre-adult years. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 306.

PSY 310. Psychology of Death. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Psychological aspects of death, loss and grief, including scientific findings, person-culture transactions and expressions in the arts and humanities. Personal exploration and interdisciplinary application of psychology to issues such as death anxiety, dying processes, funerals, immortality beliefs, suicide, and grieving. 4 lectures.

PSY 311. Environmental Psychology. 4 units

GE Area D5

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area A with a grade of C- or better; and GE Area D4 (PSY 201 or PSY 202 recommended).

Interrelationship between behavior and the built and natural environments. Evaluating and understanding environments, environmental stress, and the human aspects of environmental problems. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE D5 except for Psychology and Child Development majors.

PSY 317. Psychology of Stress. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Examines the relationship between stress and psychological and physical well-being. Research on the psychological factors influencing stress as well as a description and critical evaluation of methods of stress reduction. 4 lectures.

PSY 318. Psychology of Aging. 4 units

GE Area D5

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Junior standing or PSY major; completion of GE Area A with a grade of C- or better; one lower-division GE Area D course (PSY 201 or PSY 202 recommended).

Psychological and physiological aging in the context of the culture. Theories and research relating to the issues of stability and both positive and negative changes in perception, learning, memory, intelligence, personality, identity, motivation, sexuality, family relationships, career. Disorders, institutionalization, death and bereavement. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE D5 except for Psychology and Child Development majors.

PSY 320. Health Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Scientific study of how mental, behavioral, and social processes affect physical health. Topics include health-risk behaviors and promotion of personal control over health improvement, social status and health disparities, stress and coping, and the patient-provider relationship. 4 lectures.

PSY 323. The Helping Relationship. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Junior standing, completion of one USCP course, Psychology and Child Development majors only, or consent of instructor.

Basic skills and approaches common to helping relationships with children, adults, and families. Examines theoretical, empirical, and practical applications of helping. Differentiation between professional, paraprofessional, and nonprofessional helping relationships. 2 lectures, 2 activities.

PSY 324. Psychology of Gender. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Investigation of psychological genders and sexualities beyond ideas associated with biological sex. Exploration of sex/gender/sexuality differences from a social psychological (e.g., socialization) perspective. Implications of gender roles (including masculinity, femininity, non-binary) and sexual identities for relationships and health. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as PSY/WGS 324.

PSY 325. Introduction to Positive Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Scientific study of the enhancement of strengths and optimal functioning in humans. Basic research, assessment and helping concepts in understanding optimal functioning within diverse populations. 4 lectures.

PSY 329. Research Methods in Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202, STAT 217 or STAT 211, or consent of instructor.

Introduction to research methods used in psychology and other behavioral sciences. Topics include the logic and ethics of research; experimental, correlational, and survey methodology; library search strategies; basic statistical procedures; and the format of the research report. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

PSY 330. Behavioral Effects of Psychoactive Drugs. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Completion of GE D4.

Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs. Social and psychological issues related to drug use and misuse. 4 lectures.

PSY 333. Quantitative Research Methods for the Behavioral Sciences. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 329 or SOC 333, and STAT 217, or consent of instructor.

Thorough introduction to the quantitative aspects of empirical research. Using SPSS statistical software, students will learn how to choose, conduct, and interpret analyses of research data from different behavioral science disciplines. 2 lectures, 1 activity.

PSY 340. Biopsychology. 4 units

GE Area B5

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Relationship between physiological and behavioral processes such as learning and memory, language, sleep, and abnormal behavior. Information processing, biochemistry, and structural organization at the cellular and nervous system levels. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE B5.

PSY 344. Behavioral Genetics. 4 units

GE Area B5

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202; and one of the following: ASCI 112, BIO 111, BIO 123, BIO 161, or BIO 213. Recommended: STAT 217 or STAT 218.

Examine the relative influence of genetic and environmental factors on human behavior. Emphasis on the foundation and application of behavioral genetics to the field of psychology. Topics include heritability, gene-environment interplay, ethics, and emerging technologies. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE B5.

PSY 350. Teamwork. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: Completion of GE D4.

Group dynamics applied to teams. Topics include team development, basic team processes, conflict management, decision making, leadership, problem solving, and the impacts of diversity and culture on teams. Focus on effective use of teams in the workplace. Not open to students with credit for PSY 351. 4 lectures.

PSY 351. Group Dynamics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 252 or PSY 323.

Dynamics of small groups. Topics include functions of groups, group structure, power, leadership, intragroup conflict, personal space and territoriality, groups as agents of societal and personal change. Demonstrations emphasizing experiential learning in groups. Not open to students with credit for PSY 350. 2 lectures, 2 activities.

PSY 352. Conflict Resolution: Violent and Nonviolent. 4 units

GE Area D5

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: Junior standing or PSY major; completion of GE Area A with a grade of C- or better; and one lower-division GE area D course (PSY 201 or PSY 202 recommended).

Psychological, situational, political, and cultural determinants of violence and nonviolence in interpersonal, intergroup, and international conflict. Self-assessment of conflict resolution attitudes, competencies, and behaviors. Negotiation, mediation, and other approaches to conflict management. Educational and structural approaches to violence prevention. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE D5 except for Psychology and Child Development majors.

PSY 360. Applied Social Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 252.

Applications of social psychology to education, business and industry, environmental problems, interpersonal and intergroup relations, health and welfare, mass communication, judicial systems, and politics. Analysis of social and organizational problems, methods of intervention, and program evaluation. 4 seminars.

PSY 370. Introduction to Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202 and at least one other PSY course.

Introduction to the fields of clinical and counseling psychology. History, education and training, theories, assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. Introduction to diverse settings, ethical principles, legal guidelines, credentialing and employment opportunities. 4 lectures.

PSY 372. Multicultural Psychology. 4 units

USCP

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202; and sophomore standing.

The impact of culture, ethnicity, and race on human behavior within the framework of psychological theory and research. Emphasis on ethnic minority groups within the U.S. including: African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Latino/a Americans. Not open to students in MS Psychology program. 4 seminars.

PSY 375. Forensic Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Application and practice of psychology in both the civil and criminal justice systems. Examination of police and investigative psychology, correctional psychology, expert witness testimony, psychological evaluations for the courts, understanding aggression. 4 lectures.

PSY 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Individual investigation, research, study or survey of selected problems in consultation and with prior approval of instructor. Written report required. Total credit limited to 4 units.

PSY 401. Special Problems: Experiential Learning. 2-4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Psychology major or gerontology minor, junior standing, and consent of instructor.

Supervised experience in various community, governmental, educational, or research settings. Especially designed for individuals in applied settings requiring additional hours or a pre-fieldwork training experience. Applied psychological, developmental, or educational experiences determined by participating institution, supervising faculty member, and student. Cannot be substituted for PSY 448, PSY 449, PSY 453, or PSY 454. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 4 units.

PSY 405. Abnormal Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202.

Normal and abnormal behavior in everyday life. Anxiety, somatoform, dissociative, mood, childhood, personality, psychotic, cognitive, eating, and substance use disorders and their treatment. 4 lectures.

PSY 410. History and Systems of Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 333.

Survey of the philosophical and scientific roots of modern psychology, pioneer laboratories, systems, and schools of psychology, the refining of experimental methods, and applications of psychology in testing and psychological services. Examination of contributions by women and minorities in psychology. 4 seminars.

PSY 417. Interpersonal Relationships in Childhood and Adolescence. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: CD 304, CD 305 or CD 306; or PSY 256 and PSY 305.

Current theories and research on the development of interpersonal relationships in childhood and adolescence. Topics may include parent-child relationships, peer relationships in childhood, intimate relationships in adolescence. The Schedule of Classes will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 417.

PSY 419. Self and Identity. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 256 or PSY 305 and senior standing.

Concepts, theories, and research related to the development of the self across the lifespan. Examination of the influence of temperament, culture, individuation, self-esteem, self-awareness, roles and identity on maturity. 4 seminars.

PSY 430. Sensation and Perception. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: PSY 340.

Principles of sensory systems, psychophysics, attention and the perception of color, shape, movement, space, and time. Survey of the development of perception through the lifespan. 4 lectures.

PSY 431. Assessing Children's Development and Environments. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: CD 304 or CD 305 or PSY 419 or PSY 420 or PSY 421; and CD 329 or PSY 329.

Current developmental and environmental assessments used in care and educational settings and in prevention programs and research. Practice using, creating, and evaluating child assessments. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 431.

PSY 432. Psychological Testing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 333.

Theory and practice of psychological measurement and testing. Principles of test construction, administration, and interpretation. Survey of common testing domains such as intelligence, scholastic aptitude and achievement, and personality. 4 lectures.

PSY 448. Research Internship I. 5 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 329, PSY 333, Psychology and Child Development majors only, junior standing, and consent of instructor.

Faculty-supervised research experience on various topics in psychology. Student apprenticeship with a department faculty member to conduct research. Responsibilities include some or all of the following: collecting data, entering and/or analyzing data, electronic literature search, report writing. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 449. Research Internship II. 5 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 329, PSY 333, Psychology and Child Development majors only, junior standing, and consent of instructor.

Faculty-supervised research experience on various topics in psychology. Student apprenticeship with a department faculty member to conduct research. Responsibilities include some or all of the following: collecting data, entering and/or analyzing data, electronic literature search, report writing. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 450. Family Intervention. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 254, or graduate standing.

Basic elements of marriage and family therapy and crisis intervention. Emphasis on concepts, goals, and techniques of various family therapy approaches and family crisis intervention. 4 lectures.

PSY 453. Supervised Fieldwork I. 5 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 323, Psychology and Child Development majors only, junior standing, and consent of instructor.

Supervised fieldwork experience in various community, governmental, and educational settings. Applied psychological, developmental, or educational experiences determined by participating institution, supervising faculty member, and student. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 454. Supervised Field Work II. 5 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 323, Psychology and Child Development majors only, junior standing, and consent of instructor.

Supervised fieldwork experience in various community, governmental, and educational settings. Applied psychological, developmental, or educational experiences determined by participating institution, supervising faculty member, and student. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 456. Behavioral Disorders in Childhood. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202, junior standing.

Applications of psychological principles to childhood behavioral disorders. Aggression, delinquency, stress reactions, motivational, perceptual-attentional deficiencies, psychoses, anxiety disorders, biological dysfunctions, and social, emotional and intellectual disabilities. 4 seminars. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 456.

PSY 457. Memory and Cognition. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 333.

Principles and theories of memory and cognition including processes; models of perception, attention and memory; concept formation; language; intelligence; problem-solving and decision making; creativity; applications to areas such as law, artificial intelligence, and education. 4 lectures.

PSY 458. Learning. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: PSY 333.

Theoretical and philosophical foundations of the experimental analysis of behavior. Principles of classical and operant conditioning including aversive control of behavior through punishment and avoidance learning and the theoretical basis for behavior therapy techniques and applications of learning principles in education and health settings. 4 lectures.

PSY 459. Lifespan Theories. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202, junior standing.

Comparative study of theories that have been offered as explanations for lifespan development. Controversial issues, evaluations and applications of theories. Emphasis on biological, psychological, and social aspects of lifespan development. 4 seminars.

PSY 460. Child Abuse and Neglect. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202 and junior standing.

Issues in child maltreatment, including definitions and forms, causes, consequences, assessment, reporting, treatment, and prevention. Possible links among research, intervention, and public policy will be emphasized. 4 seminars. Crosslisted as CD/PSY 460.

PSY 461. Senior Project Seminar. 1 unit

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Senior standing; PSY 329; Psychology and Child Development majors only.

Discussion of occupational and graduate school opportunities and of current issues in psychology for the purpose of defining professional objectives and individual projects for PSY 462. Senior project progress reports with class critique. Credit/No Credit grading only. 1 seminar.

PSY 462. Senior Project. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 461; Psychology and Child Development majors only.

Design and completion of a faculty-supervised project in psychology. The project must be presented in a formal, written report. Minimum of 90 hours total time.

PSY 465. Cross-Cultural International Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or PSY 202 and junior standing.

Psychological, cultural, ecological and behavioral influences on human development in different cultural settings. Focuses on from one to three different cultures outside the U.S. in any given quarter. 4 seminars.

PSY 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Schedule of Classes will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 4 seminars.

PSY 475. The Social Psychology of Prejudice. 4 units

USCP

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 252 or PSY 254 or PSY 256.

Examination of social psychological frameworks for understanding the origins and consequences of prejudice and ways to improve relationships between people who come from different social groups (e.g., race, ethnicity, class, age, sexual orientation, gender). 4 lectures. Fulfills USCP.

PSY 485. Cooperative Education Experience. 6 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

Part-time work experience in business, industry, government, and other areas of student career interest. Positions are paid and usually require relocation and registration in course for two consecutive quarters. Formal report and evaluation by work supervisor required. Major credit limited to 6 units; total credit limited to 12 units. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 495. Cooperative Education Experience. 12 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of instructor.

Full-time work experience in business, industry, government, and other areas of student career interest. Positions are paid and usually require relocation and registration in course for two consecutive quarters. Formal report and evaluation by work supervisor required. Major credit limited to 6 units; total credit limited to 12 units. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 500. Individual Study. 1-6 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Consent of department head, graduate major advisor and supervising faculty member.

Advanced study planned and completed under the direction of a member of the department faculty. Open only to graduate students who have demonstrated ability to do independent work. Enrollment by petition. Only 6 units may be applied to degree requirements.

PSY 504. Psychopharmacology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Advanced course in brain-behavior relationships. Neuropathology of brain disorders including the neurochemical etiology and treatment of mental illness and chemical dependency. 4 seminars.

PSY 520. Marriage & Family Therapy: Professional Identity, Theory and Practice. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.S. in Psychology program.

History, development, and systemic foundations of the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. Major models and theories of family therapy with focus on the sociocultural contexts of defining healthy and dysfunctional dynamics, treatment goals, and associated approaches. Current issues relating to professional identity and functioning in the field. 4 seminars.

PSY 535. Child and Adolescent Psychopathology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: enrollment in the M.S. in Psychology program.

Etiological, assessment, diagnostic, and treatment models of child and adolescent disorders. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Genetic, neurobiological, environmental, and sociocultural factors of childhood disorders within a developmental perspective. Current theory, research, and practice emphasized. 4 seminars.

PSY 555. Counseling & Communication. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: PSY 560 and admission to MS Psychology program.

Overview of the counseling profession, history, philosophy, theory, and ethics. Emphasis on developing interviewing, assessment and communication skills. 3 seminars, 1 activity.

PSY 556. Multicultural Counseling and Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 555, PSY 560 and admission to MS Psychology program.

Psychological, cultural, and ecological analysis of the experiences and histories of various cultural groups within the United States. Development of personal self-awareness of multicultural issues and culturally relevant counseling skills. 4 seminars.

PSY 560. Individual Therapy: Theory and Application. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: Admission to MS Psychology program.

Counseling theories and concepts applied to individuals. Develop skills in interviewing, assessment, intervention selection, termination and crisis intervention. Ethics and law included. 4 seminars.

PSY 564. Ethics and the Law: MF Therapy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SU

Prerequisite: PSY 520; PSY 560; and admission to MS Psychology program.

Ethical, legal and case management issues related to individual, child, family and group therapy. Client rights and professional orientation to ethical standards and state regulation of clinical practice. 4 seminars.

PSY 565. Diagnosis and Treatment: Psychopathology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: PSY 560 and admission to MS Psychology program.

Assessment of mental status. Diagnostic and statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, treatment planning, treatment case documentation and research applied to client psychopathology. 4 seminars.

PSY 566. Group Therapy: Theory and Application. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 560 and admission to MS Psychology program.

Group therapy theory, leadership and research applied to client assessment, screening, treatment selection, evaluation and termination. Ethics, law included. 4 seminars.

PSY 568. Advanced Psychotherapies. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: PSY 555, PSY 560, PSY 565 and admission to MS Psychology program, or consent of instructor.

Theory and application of advanced approaches in psychotherapy, including, but not limited to: cognitive-behavioral therapies, psychodynamic therapies and humanistic/existential therapies. The Schedule of Classes will list therapy selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 4 seminars.

PSY 569. Counseling Clinic Practicum. 3 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 520; PSY 555; PSY 560; PSY 565; and admission to MS Psychology program.

Applied experience and instruction in assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning and treatment of individuals, couples, families and children under direct supervision of faculty in program clinic. Total credit limited to 12 units. Credit/No Credit grading only.

PSY 570. Selected Advanced Topics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Admission to MS Psychology program or consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to graduate students and selected seniors. Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 4 seminars.

PSY 571. Advanced Family Therapy: Theory and Application. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: PSY 520; PSY 555; and admission to MS Psychology program.

Theory and application of process, structural and systems approaches to family therapy. Assessment, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of family therapy. Ethics and law related to family therapy. 4 seminars.

PSY 572. Child and Adolescent Therapy: Theory and Application. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: PSY 535; PSY 555; PSY 560; and admission to MS Psychology program.

Assessment, diagnosis, treatment planning and therapeutic modalities appropriate for children and adolescents. Both theoretically based and empirically based treatment approaches presented. Instruction in the assessment and treatment of abuse and neglect of children with relevant ethics and law. 4 seminars.

PSY 574. Psychological Assessment. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: Admission to MS Psychology program.

Administration, scoring and interpretation of psychological tests. Reliability and validity of psychological measures. Ethical and cultural issues in testing. 4 seminars.

PSY 575. Gender and Couple Therapy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: PSY 520; PSY 560; and admission to MS Psychology program.

Antecedents to sex-role identity, gender aware therapy, couple therapy, treatment of spousal/partner abuse; human sexuality, behavior, and psychosexual dysfunction. 4 seminars.

PSY 576. Traineeship: Marital and Family Therapy. 4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: PSY 569, PSY 564 and consent of MS program committee.

Supervised experience in applied psychotherapeutic techniques, assessment, diagnosis and treatment of individual, marital, family and child relationship problems. Total credit limited to 16 units. Credit/No Credit grading only. Weekly seminar with on-site and university supervisors.

PSY 577. Community Mental Health: Issues and Practices. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: Admission to the MS Program in Psychology; PSY 535; PSY 555; PSY 556; and PSY 560.

An overview of community mental health as envisioned via California's Mental Health Services Act. Examination of the opportunities and challenges in delivering effective mental health services in publicly-funded settings. Exploration of concepts and practices, including the recovery model and innovative approaches. 4 seminars.

PSY 585. Research Methods for Counseling Psychology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Research methods relevant to practitioners in counseling psychology and human services. Basic understanding of descriptive and inferential statistics as well as applications related to these topics. 4 seminars.

PSY 588. Assessment and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; PSY 560; PSY 565; and PSY 574.

Etiological and biopsychosocial factors, as well as assessment, diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment of substance use disorders. Differential diagnosis, co-occurrence with other conditions, unique population concerns, including use across the lifespan, and local treatment options will be discussed. 4 seminars.

PSY 599. Thesis. 2-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PSY 585 and advancement to candidacy.

Completion of a thesis pertinent to the fields of psychology and human services. Total credit limited to 8 units.

Kelly Ann Bennion
B.A., Middlebury College, 2010; Ed.M., Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2011; Ph.D., Boston College, 2016.

Jay Bettergarcia
B.S., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 2009; M.A., San Francisco State University, 2011; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2016.

Shawn Meghan Burn
B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University, 1982; M.A., The Claremont Graduate University, 1984; Ph.D., 1988.

Laura Cacciamani
B.S., Carnegie Mellon University, 2009; M.A., The University of Arizona, 2010; Ph.D., 2014.

Denise H. Daniels
B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1982; M.A., Pacific Oaks College, 1983; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1992.

Aaron R. Estrada
B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2001; M.S., San Francisco State University, 2006; M.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2008; Ph.D., 2011.

Laura A. Freberg
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 1974; M.A., 1975; Ph.D., 1979.

Julie A. Garcia
B.A., California State University, San Bernardino, 1996; Ph.D., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2005.

Jennifer Jipson
B.A., Smith College, 1993; M.S., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1996; Ph.D., 2000.

Jasna Jovanovic
B.S., University of Illinois, 1985; M.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1987; Ph.D. 1991.

Jessica Kaczorowski
B.A., University of California, San Diego, 2005; M.A., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2008; Ph.D., 2012.

Carrie A. Langner
B.A., University of Michigan, 1997; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2005.

Gary D. Laver
B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1983; M.A., Claremont Graduate University, 1987; Ph.D., 1992.

Linda Lee
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 1999; M.Ed., Harvard Graduate School of Education, 2000; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2007.

Daniel J. Levi
B.A., Lehigh University, 1973; M.S., University of Arizona, 1979; Ph.D., 1981.

J. Kelly Moreno
B.S., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1980; M.S., University of Utah, 1985; Ph.D., 1988. Licensed Psychologist, California.

Jennifer Teramoto Pedrotti
B.A., University of California, Davis, 1996; M.S., University of Kansas, 2000; Ph.D., 2003.

Julie Spencer Rodgers
B.Sc., Carleton University, 1993; B.A., 1995; M.S., San Francisco State University, 1998; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2005.

Kathleen A. Ryan
B.A., San Diego State University, 1975; M.A., Bowling Green State University, 1978; Ph.D., 1980.

Donald H. Ryujin
B.A., Stanford University, 1968; M.A., University of Michigan, 1972; Ph.D., 1983.

Michael J. Selby
B.S., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1971; M.S., California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, 1981; Ph.D., Memphis State University, 1988. Licensed Psychologist, California.

Charles M. Slem
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 1968; Ph.D., Wayne State University, 1975.

Taylor F. Smith
B.A., SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, 2006; M.S. UNC at Greensboro, 2009; Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2012; Professional Degree, Brown University/Alpert Med School/RIH, 2014.

Lisa I. Sweatt
B.S., University of California, Irvine, 1989; M.A., Ohio State University, 1992; Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago, 1999. Licensed Psychologist, California.

Debra L. Valencia-Laver
B.S., University of California, Irvine, 1983; M.S., The Claremont Graduate University, 1988; Ph.D., 1992.

Jason A. Williams
B.A., University of California, Riverside, 1989; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz, 2001.