Orfalea College of Business

Catalog Home

Business Bldg. (03), Room 455
Phone: 805.756.2705
http://www.cob.calpoly.edu/

Interim Dean: Kevin Lertwachara
Interim Associate Dean: Stern Neill
Associate Dean: Sanjiv Jaggia
Assistant Dean: Amy Carter
Assistant Dean of Advancement: Mary Kelting
Advancement Director: Tina Guerrero

Academic Programs 

Program name Program type
AccountingMinor, MS
Business AdministrationBS, MBA
Business AnalyticsMS
EconomicsBS, Minor, MS
EngineeringMBA, MS
Industrial TechnologyMinor
Industrial Technology and PackagingBS
Integrated Marketing CommunicationsMinor
PackagingMinor
TaxationMS

Mission Statement

We prepare career-ready, global business leaders through hands-on discovery and application.

Amplifications of our Mission Statement

  • We strive to contribute to the well being of our students and the communities to which they belong by instilling in them a love and an ability for learning and discovery that will serve them for the rest of their lives. We reinforce this by cultivating that love and ability for learning and discovery within ourselves.
  • We embrace the principles in the 1940 AAUP Statement of Academic Freedom.
  • We treat one another with respect and integrity, communicate honestly, and consult with one another when making important decisions that affect our learning community.
  • We value research that is theoretical, applied and interdisciplinary, rooted in both our academic disciplines and the scholarship of teaching and learning.
  • We are committed to providing our academically talented students with hands-on experiences and  opportunities for discovery.
  • Members of our community are ready to contribute to one another, to our organizations, and to the world.
  • We challenge students, faculty and staff to assume responsibility for lifelong learning.
  • We are committed to earning external accreditation of our college and its programs.

The BS degree program and the graduate programs in Business Administration are accredited by the AACSB–The International Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The BS degree program in Industrial Technology is accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE). The objective of accreditation is to foster high quality educational programs.

The college is organized into seven areas: Accounting, Economics, Finance, Industrial Technology and Packaging, Marketing Management and Graduate Management Programs. This organizational structure allows for programs of study that blend broad-based knowledge of the functional disciplines of Business and Economics with an in-depth study of particular discipline(s).

The college's educational philosophy follows the Cal Poly tradition–that of enlisting maximum student involvement in the learning process through case analysis, special projects, internships, computer simulations and other learn by doing exercises. The college has state-of-the-art computer facilities which are available to students to meet their coursework needs. Educational programs are designed to challenge highly motivated students to become tomorrow’s socially responsible business leaders through a learn-by- doing technology oriented education. The curricula include general education requirements and specialized studies in the student's major field. Optional areas of concentration within each major enable the student to select the program most closely suited to the chosen career field. 

Business Honor Society

Beta Gamma Sigma is the honor society serving business programs accredited by AACSB International – The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest recognition a business student anywhere in the world can receive in a business program accredited by AASCB International.  Only 7% of the junior class and 10% of the senior class are invited to join. The mission of Beta Gamma Sigma is to encourage and honor academic achievement in the study of business and to foster personal and professional excellence among its members. For further information, please contact the Dean’s Office, 805.756.2705.

Advising Center

Business Bldg. (03), Room 100
Phone: 805.756.2601
www.cob.calpoly.edu/advising

The Advising Center Mission Statement

The Orfalea College of Business Advising Center serves as a peer-driven resource for students seeking academic guidance. Trained and knowledgeable staff provide all students of the Orfalea College of Business community to achieve their unique educational goals by providing timely and effective support in a professional, welcoming environment. We give students the resources needed to successfully negotiate the curriculum they select and empower them to make educated decisions.

The Peer Advising Model

The Orfalea College of Business Advising Center utilizes a student-to-student advising structure, which has been proven as a key factor to successful graduation rates. It is beneficial for students to meet with peer advisors, who are extensively trained on all college and university policies, expectations, curriculum and resources for advising students in their major.

Peer advisors take part in a quarter-long highly specialized training program to meet the needs of all Business, Economics, and Industrial Technology students. They update and review students’ files before an advising session and are prepared to answer any questions or concerns the students may have about the curriculum and/or policies. Two professional academic advisors are involved with direct supervision and specialty student concerns; their appointments involve career/internship advising and serving students with special concerns, assisting students having academic difficulty. Faculty advisors within the college provide further information on course content, career planning, and clarification on concentration areas. Faculty advisors are assigned by the student’s area office or by the student’s concentration.

Areas of Specialty

  • Academic advising and planning courses towards graduation
  • Assist students with strategies for success in their academics
  • Advising students on academic probation
  • Interpretation of curriculum sheets and flowcharts, articulation agreements, requirements towards degree, and online advising tools
  • Change of major advising
  • Study abroad advising
  • College and university policies and procedures
  • Process forms related to student’s degree progress
  • Quarterly advising workshops and programs

Transfer Students

Transfer students to the Orfalea College of Business should refer to the curricula listed for the appropriate major. Please note that all lower division courses may be completed at most California Community Colleges. Full time students who have successfully completed all lower division courses prior to transferring to the College of Business can usually anticipate graduating in six quarters. Admitted transfer students should seek immediate advising assistance from the Advising Center.

The college is organized into the following areas, allowing for programs of study that blend broad-based knowledge of the functional disciplines of Business and Economics with an in-depth study of particular discipline(s).

Undergraduate Programs

Accounting and Business Law

Economics

Finance

Industrial Technology

Interdisciplinary Studies

Management, Human Resources, and Information Systems

Marketing

BS Business Administration 

The undergraduate business program provides students with the knowledge and the analytical skills essential for employment in all sectors of business, industry, governmental and non-profit organizations. Graduates of the business program will understand the fundamentals of how a successful enterprise operates, and will have sufficient depth in an area of study to begin a successful career by providing immediate value to an organization. 

The Orfalea College of Business engages in a comprehensive assessment plan to ensure student achievement of these objectives.

The Business Administration degree program consists of five components: Major, Concentration, Support, General Education, and Electives.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

Concentrations

Concentrations are provided for students preparing for careers in Accounting, Financial Management, Management, Information Systems, Marketing Management, Entrepreneurship, and Consumer Packaging Solutions. 

The Quantitative concentration and the Real Estate concentration offered under the BS Economics, are also available to Business Administration majors.

Choose from:

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Accounting and Business Law Area

Business Bldg. (03), Room 403
Phone: 805.756.1543

Area Chair: Doug Cerf

Accounting provides information for making informed business decisions by decision makers both external and internal to the firm. The Accounting and Business Law Area works closely with the accounting profession to help ensure curriculum relevancy and technical competency. The accounting program offers a Master of Science (see Graduate Programs). The Master of Science along with the Accounting concentration or minor allows the student to meet the academic requirements for licensure as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA).

Accounting Minor

New program, effective Winter 2016

The minor is designed to provide students from other majors a basic foundation in accounting.  Upon successful completion of the minor, students will have coursework that can be applied towards the requirements for licensure as a Certified Public Accountant in California and most other states.  Students wishing to pursue such licensure are encouraged to pursue a Master of Science in Accounting (specializing in either financial accounting or taxation) upon completion of their undergraduate education.

Students applying to the minor must be at sophomore level standing with a minimum GPA of 3.0.  Acceptance into the Accounting minor is not guaranteed and capacity is limited.  The Accounting Area will select only the most qualified applicants with an interest in pursuing licensure. Not open to Business and Economics majors.

Minor Requirements
 

Economics Area

Business Bldg. (03), Room 407
Phone: 805.756.2783

Area Chair: Steve Hamilton

BS Economics

The mission of the economics program is to educate students in the models and problem solving tools of economics. The degree program:

  • instructs students on the analytical tools of economics and the application of these tools to business and social problems,
  • instructs students on the economic structure of our society and its interdependence with the global marketplace,
  • instructs students about the economic forces that affect business, the natural environment, technology and political decision-making,
  • instructs students on the role of business, government and households in our economy,
  • prepares students for successful careers in business, government and non-profit organizations, and
  • prepares students for graduate studies in business, economics, law and public administration.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

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Concentrations

A concentration is not required to complete the General Economics field of study. Concentrations can be chosen from accounting, entrepreneurship, finance, management, marketing, consumer packaging solutions, management information systems, quantitative or real estate. 

Students may develop their own program of study by selecting one of the following: 1) an economics concentration; or 2) a business concentration.

Choose from:

For the requirements of each concentration, please check the information listed under the Business major.

Economics Minor

Business Bldg. (03), Room 407
Phone: 805.756.2783

This minor is designed to give students from other majors a general competency in economics. Students are encouraged to meet with the advisor of the Economics Minor to develop a course of study that complements their major curriculum. For more information, contact the Economics Area office.

Minor Requirements
 

Finance Area

Business Bldg. (03), Room 407
Phone: 805.756.1472

Area Chair: John Dobson

The Financial Management (FM) concentration provides a rigorous, coherent, real-world-based, and up-to-date curriculum which prepares students for rewarding careers. The FM students gain in-depth knowledge of Fixed Income Securities (Bond Markets), Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (Equity and Derivative Markets), Corporate  Finance (Mergers and Acquisitions and Initial Public Offerings), Alternative Investments (Foreign Exchange, Commodities and Real Estate), and Quantitative Methods.

Finance classes are taught in the Financial Analysis Resource Center, a special-purpose classroom with data terminals, and real time display of stock prices. The computers are equipped with financial data and software, which permits students to work on real-world problems - individually and in teams.

Finance students have outstanding internship and senior project opportunities, including the ability to pursue the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation; the ability to participate in the Student Managed Portfolio Project, where they assume an active role in investing Cal Poly Corporation endowment funds; and the opportunity to intern with major corporations, investment banks, and money management firms. Our graduates pursue careers in Financial Services, Corporate Finance, and as Financial Analysts, working for investment banks, brokerage firms, the asset management industry, the real estate industry, consulting firms, and other facets of business.

Financial Management Concentration

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Management, Human Resources, and Information Systems Area

Business Bldg. (03), Room 405
Phone: 805.756.2012

Area Chair: James Sena

The Management, Human Resources, and Information Systems Area's goals are fourfold:

  1. to provide students with management theories, strategies, and practices essential for understanding how modern organizations operate and succeed in a complex and global environment,
  2. to introduce students to the information technologies that enable the success of critical business processes and enhance worker creativity and productivity,
  3. to engage students in learning about team dynamics and team leadership, and
  4. to prepare our graduates, through a focus on experiential learning, for rewarding careers in a myriad of industries.

The Management, Human Resources, and Information Systems Area offers all business students coursework in organizational behavior, information systems, international management, and business strategy. We offer concentration specific courses in both of the concentrations that are housed in the Management, Human Resources, and Information Systems Area: (1) Management and Human Resources, and (2) Information Systems.

Management and Human Resources Concentration

Information Systems Concentration

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Marketing Area

Business Bldg. (03), Room 403
Phone: 805.756.1543

Area Chair: Norm Borin

The Marketing Management concentration cultivates agile marketers, who integrate data analytics, critical thinking and creativity. The curriculum is a conscious balance among the technical rigors of data, the nuance of creative strategy, and the finesse of customer relationship management. Students engage in hands-on projects that provide experience and confidence. From market research to communications strategies, students have opportunities to provide data-driven guidance and creative solutions to local startups, Cal Poly organizations, and the community.

As a discipline with broad applications, the Marketing Management concentration offers flexible career paths and work styles. Graduates are in demand for positions in market research and analytics; business development and sales; and marketing communications, advertising, digital and product marketing.

Marketing Management Concentration
 

Interdisciplinary Studies

Entrepreneurship Concentration

Business Bldg. (03), Room 405
Phone: 805. 756.5188

Concentration Coordinator: Jon York

This interdisciplinary concentration provides an environment in which students develop an entrepreneurial mindset and acquire the knowledge and decision skills necessary to envision, plan and implement new ventures in start-up and existing organizations, domestic and international settings, in either service, product or technology-based companies and in for-profit and non-profit contexts. It draws expertise and coursework from across the College and emphasizes interdisciplinary problem-based learning.

Entrepreneurship Concentration 

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Consumer Packaging Solutions Concentration

Business Bldg. (03), Room 405
Phone: 805.756.2676

Concentration Coordinator: Javier de la Fuente

This concentration provides business majors entry into a rapidly expanding and dynamic field, packaging, that has been fueled by the globalization of manufacturing and customer-supplier relationships. This trend has been enabled by new approaches to value chain management, product development and packaging technology. This concentration will allow the students to:

  1. conceptualize packaging designs that meet customer needs
  2. validate designs with data and customer insight
  3. gain familiarity with packaging materials and related test equipment
  4. conduct qualitative and quantitative marketing analysis for products
  5. comprehend packaging costs, sustainability issues and industry trends and
  6. understand supply chain management and logistics related issues

Lessons are drawn from a range of established and emerging industries such as  food, automotive, biomedical devices and electronics.

Consumer Packaging Solutions Concentration

Industrial Technology Area

Business Bldg. (03), Room 405
Phone: 805.756.2676

Area Chair: Eric Olsen

BS Industrial Technology and Packaging

The Industrial Technology and Packaging program incorporates a broad range of technical skills and business management to prepare individuals for positions in technology management or as entrepreneurs. The curriculum is particularly suited for careers that involve working with people and technology. The collaborative, project-based classes/laboratories create well-rounded, problem solving graduates that would be successful and quickly functional in a variety of industries including manufacturing and packaging.  Students develop a strong foundation in science, liberal arts, business and management disciplines; a technical core including industrial power systems, materials and processes, quality management, lean six sigma, safety management, packaging, and product  development. The curriculum includes extensive hands-on coursework in two areas of emphasis: Industrial Technology (IT) and Packaging Technology (PT). The IT emphasis area offers courses pertinent to general operations management, supply chain management and lean processes, while the PT emphasis area offers specialized courses in design and testing of packaging products and systems.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

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Industrial Technology Minor

Industrial Technology
Business Bldg. (03), Room 405
Phone: 805.756.2676

The minor in Industrial Technology offers a choice of courses in Technology Issues; Operations and Packaging;  and Organizational Issues. These courses provide supplemental knowledge and skills for nontechnical majors who wish a position related to operations of a company.

Minor Requirements 
 

Packaging Minor

Industrial Technology
Business Bldg. (03), Room 405
Phone: 805.756.2676

The purpose of this interdisciplinary minor is to complement the non-Industrial Technology and Packaging majors with a planned curriculum in packaging. The program is designed to capitalize on theories and skills learned in other disciplines thereby uniquely preparing students for success as packaging professionals in positions ranging from highly technical research and development through purchasing, production, sales and management.

Students gain the skills needed for the design of package forms and graphics, the specifications of materials and machinery to be used, the evaluation of package systems, as well as the planning and coordinating of packaging requirements. These specialized skills result from an integration of knowledge gained through the packaging curriculum with that of the major discipline. A significant understanding of packaging issues and their impact on the industry is also gained.

Minor Requirements
 

Integrated Marketing Communications Minor

Minor Coordinators:

Marketing Area Chair: Lynn E. Metcalf
Business Bldg. (03), Room 402
Phone: 805.756.2010
lmetcalf@calpoly.edu

Graphic Communication Chair: Ken Macro
Graphic Arts Bldg. (26), Room 216
Phone: 805.756.2257
kmacro@calpoly.edu

Journalism Chair: Mary Glick
Graphic Arts Bldg. (26), Room 228-A
Phone: 805.756.6738
mmglick@calpoly.edu
 

The Integrated Marketing Communications Minor provides students with the skills needed to acquire and leverage customer insights, to create and deploy visual, graphic, and written content across traditional and digital media channels, and to analyze the impact. Students use industry standard tools and work collaboratively with peers from complementary disciplines to develop integrated marketing campaigns for companies.

Graduates are in demand for positions in social media, integrated media, content marketing, digital marketing, brand storytelling, visual storytelling, and analytics and optimization. The opportunities and job titles are many and growing.

Minor Requirements
 

Environmental Studies Minor

Please see the College of Science and Mathematics for more information on this interdisciplinary minor. 

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Graduate Programs

Master of Business Administration

Business Bldg. (03), Room 409
Phone: 805.756.2637
mba@calpoly.edu
http://mba.calpoly.edu/

Associate Dean: Sanjiv Jaggia

Programs of Study/Specializations Available

MBA - General Management
MBA - Graphic Communication Document Systems Management Specialization
MBA -Architectural Management Track
MBA - Landscape Architectural Management Track

General Characteristics

Cal Poly's MBA programs are designed to prepare students to enter successful management positions in industry, government, and not-for-profit organizations. The programs give graduates a broad management background. Cal Poly’s MBA programs are 60 to 64 units in length, depending on specialization, and consist of courses and elective courses.

The learning objectives of the MBA programs are for students to be able to:

1.1 Demonstrate competency in the following areas of business: management, quantitative methods, economics, accounting, finance, marketing, operations, and strategy.

1.2 Demonstrate strategic integration of the above areas.

1.3 Demonstrate the ability to apply analytics to decision making.

2.1 Recognize issues and create solutions using an approach that reflects ethical values.

3.1 Demonstrate knowledge of the issues involved in conducting business in a diverse, global environment.

4.1 Demonstrate professional written communications skills.

4.2 Demonstrate professional oral communication and presentation skills.

5.1 Recognize leadership skills and link to leadership theory.

5.2 Demonstrate effective team behaviors.

Prerequisites

Students are required to possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited program. The MBA program is specifically designed to provide essential business knowledge to students without assuming prior business background. Therefore, no specific prerequisite courses are required, but a basic knowledge of statistics is highly recommended.

Admission/Acceptance Requirements

Admission to the MBA programs is based upon:

  • successful completion of an accredited undergraduate program of study
  • prior academic performance with particular emphasis placed on the last 90 quarter units (60 semester units)
  • Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Records Examination general test (GRE) scores, with particular emphasis on performance on the quantitative portion
  • prior work experience (desirable).

Culminating Experience

In order to satisfy the culminating experience requirement, students must satisfactorily complete a comprehensive examination or project. Other options may be available, but must be approved in advance by the Associate Dean.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

MBA – General Management

This program allows students to take electives of particular interest that fit their specific needs or career objectives. The program consists of 36-quarter-units of required courses with the remaining elective units selected from a focused group of advanced courses.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

MBA - Graphic Communication Document Systems Management Specialization

This specialization is offered in conjunction with the Graphic Communication Department in the College of Liberal Arts, and is designed for those interested in graphic communication-related management careers. The program, focused on document systems management, contains a strong research component, including research assignments relevant to an individual company and the document industry as a whole. Students participate in research and development projects for the Graphic Communication Institute at Cal Poly.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

MBA - Architectural Management Track

This program is available only to those students who are enrolled in Cal Poly's Bachelor of Architecture (BArch) program. During the fifth/final year of the architecture program, students may request permission to enroll in MBA courses. See the Architecture section of this Catalog for information.
 

MBA - Landscape Architecture Management Track

This program is available only to those students who are currently enrolled in Cal Poly's Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) program. During the fifth/final year of the landscape architecture program, students may request permission to enroll in MBA courses. See the Landscape Architecture section of this Catalog for information.

Option to Concurrently Pursue MBA & Another Master’s Degree

The Orfalea College of Business permits students to develop an individualized program of study that incorporates the required elements of two distinct Cal Poly graduate degree programs. This option offers graduate students the opportunity to simultaneously pursue an MBA degree in the Orfalea College of Business and an MA or MS degree in one of Cal Poly's other colleges.

To participate in this option, students must apply to, meet the qualifications for, and be accepted into each program independently. Students must first apply for formal admission to one specific Cal Poly graduate program such as the MBA program. After enrollment in a specific graduate program, the student must apply to, meet the qualifications for, and be accepted into the second program. The two degrees must be awarded in the same quarter.

Depending upon the combination of degrees pursued, students may be permitted to substitute courses in the other graduate degree program for similar courses in the MBA program, thereby reducing the overall number of units. Such substitutions must be approved in advance by the OCOB Associate Dean and generally are limited to a maximum of three courses.

MS Accounting

Business Bldg. (03), Room 409
Phone: 805.756.2637
mba@calpoly.edu
http://mba.calpoly.edu/

Associate Dean: Sanjiv Jaggia

General Characteristics

The MS Accounting program is a one-year academic course of study designed to prepare students for careers that require employees to be licensed as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). This includes careers with international public accounting firms, regional and local CPA firms, industry and government. Students may select a specialization in financial accounting or taxation. The program is designed to meet the CPA eligibility requirements in the state of California effective January 2014.

All students are required to pass a comprehensive examination which is normally given during the final quarter of the program.

Tuition and Fees

The MS Accounting program is offered through Extended Education. As such, the program carries a separate tuition and fee schedule available in the Office of the Associate Dean, Orfalea College of Business.

Admission/Acceptance Requirements

Acceptance to the program is based upon an applicant’s:

  • successful completion of an accredited undergraduate program of study
    • Tax Specialization: a minimum of (i) four (4) quarter units in federal taxation and (ii) eight (8) quarter units in accounting or two (2) years of equivalent experience in accounting,
    • Financial Accounting Specialization: (i) four (4) quarter units of taxation and (ii) eight (8) quarter units of intermediate financial accounting courses1,
  • prior academic performance with particular emphasis placed on performance during the last 90 graded quarter units completed prior to application (or equivalent), and            
  • achievement on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) or Graduate Records Examination general test (GRE), with particular emphasis placed on performance on the quantitative portion.
1

 An "intermediate accounting" course includes comprehensive coverage of financial statements, assets, liabilities, investments, intangibles, equities, revenue recognition and the Cash Flows statement.

MS Accounting, Specialization in Tax

Structure

The 45/49-quarter-unit taxation specialization begins with a three-week intensive session in the summer immediately preceding the fall quarter and continues through the spring quarter of the following year. The program requires an internship during the winter quarter.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum 
 

MS Accounting, Specialization in Financial Accounting

Structure

The 45-quarter-unit financial accounting specialization begins in the fall quarter and continues through the spring quarter of the following year.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

MS Business Analytics

New program, effective Fall 2016

Business Bldg. (03), Room 409
Phone: 805.756.2637
http://www.cob.calpoly.edu/gradbusiness/

Associate Dean: Sanjiv Jaggia

General Characteristics

The MS in Business Analytics is a comprehensive, 10-month interdisciplinary business degree program that encompasses economics, finance, accounting, marketing, and information systems. The program offers a holistic approach to data analytics, combining qualitative reasoning with quantitative tools to identify key business problems and translate data analytics into decisions that improve business performance. Students will acquire broad training in all aspects of business analytics with particular emphasis on industry projects, statistical modeling and communication. Students will work on collaborative industry projects to engage with real world problems, and gain valuable experience working for a client in a team.

Admission/Acceptance Requirements

To qualify for admission to a Master’s program, you must meet the Cal Poly university admission requirements for graduate standing, which are described in the Graduate Education section of the Cal Poly Catalog, as well as professional, personal, scholastic and other standards as prescribed by the program. The program specific requirements for admission to the MS Business Analytics program must be submitted via the Cal Poly Graduate Education website and are as follows:

  • Official transcripts of all course work
  • Competitive GMAT or GRE score (valid for five years)
  • Statement of purpose
  • Two letters of recommendation
  • Completion of at least two college level courses in statistics
  • Completion of at least one college level course in calculus
  • Applicants whose native language is not English must have taken TOEFL within the last two years with a minimum score of 550 (paper version) and 213 (computerized version) or 80 (internet based). The TOEFL requirement is waived for certain applicants; see http://admissions.calpoly.edu/applicants/international/toefl_ielts.html for details.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

MS Economics

Graduate Programs in Economics
Business Bldg. (03), Room 407
Phone: 805.756.2783

Area Chair: Steve Hamilton
Director of Graduate Studies: Aric Shafran
Associate Dean: Sanjiv Jaggia
Business Bldg. (03), Room 409
Phone: 805.756.2637
econgrad@calpoly.edu
http://econgrad.calpoly.edu/

General Characteristics

The master of science degree program in economics is a full-time, four-quarter program designed to provide advanced preparation in economics for individuals desiring careers as economists in the academic, governmental, business, and financial communities. The program provides the technical skills required to engage in quantitative economic analyses that involve forecasting, market assessment, economic feasibility studies, commodity pricing and data analysis.

Tuition and Fees

The MS Economics program is offered through Extended Education. As such, the program carries a separate tuition and fee schedule available in the Office of the Associate Dean, Orfalea College of Business.

Prerequisites

For admission to the program with a classified or conditionally classified status, a student should hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 in the last 90 quarter units (60 semester units) attempted and have completed coursework in intermediate microeconomics, intermediate macroeconomics, econometrics, calculus, and statistics. Applicants are required to submit scores for the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination. An applicant who meets these standards but lacks the prerequisite coursework may be admitted as a conditionally classified student and must make up any deficiencies before advancement to classified graduate standing.

Program of Study

Graduate students must file formal study plans with their advisor, department, college, and university graduate studies office no later than the end of the quarter in which the 12th unit of approved coursework is completed. The formal program of study must include a minimum of 45 units (at least 29 of which must be at the 500 level).

Advancement to master's degree candidacy requires completion of a minimum of 24 units of required courses, specified in a formal program of study, with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all coursework completed subsequent to admission to the program.

Culminating Experience

Students are required to pass a written comprehensive exam in economics.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum
 

MBA & MS Engineering - Engineering Management Program

The dual-degree Engineering Management Program (EMP) is an interdisciplinary program linking the MBA and MS in Engineering degree programs. It is a cooperative effort between the Orfalea College of Business and the Cal Poly College of Engineering (Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering Department). Please see MBA/MS Engineering for more information.

MS Taxation

New program, effective Fall 2016

The Master of Science in Taxation at Cal Poly is recognized by the accounting firms as one of the elite programs in taxation. The program is a one-year, full-time comprehensive program, that covers a broad range of specialized tax curriculum; such as, partnership taxation, corporate taxation, state and local taxation, international tax and tax research. The degree program provides students with the opportunity to learn from nationally recognized tax scholars, major industry players and seasoned tax practitioners. Students graduating from the masters are highly sought after by recruiters, and are promoted early in public accounting, government and industry as a result of their tax expertise. The program begins with a three-week intensive summer intersession immediately preceding the fall quarter and continues through the spring quarter of the following year. Winter quarter requires an internship for class credit, where students engage in learn-by-doing at the accounting firms on sophisticated tax transactions.

Degree Requirements and Curriculum

How to Read Course Descriptions

BUS Courses

BUS 100. Student Orientation and College Success. 1 unit

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F

Orientation to academic areas (majors, minors, concentrations) within the Orfalea College of Business, including the development of a comprehensive personalized four-year plan to graduation. Career exploration to assist with future career planning and concentration selection. Exploration of skills needed for academic success: effective goal setting, time management, study skills, registration systems/strategies, and adjustment to college life. Credit/No Credit grading only. 1 lecture.

BUS 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Consent of area coordinator.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4 units.

BUS 205. Personal Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SU

Introduction to personal financial planning, including budgeting and savings, tax planning, insurance planning, equity and fixed income investments, and estate and retirement planning. Course offered online only. 4 lectures.

BUS 206. Business Professionalism and Career Readiness I. 1 unit

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Career development and preparation which includes self exploration, interpersonal communication, job functions and opportunities for different business disciplines, and formulation of career development plans. Application of technology for personal marketing plan and career development. Credit/No Credit grading only. 1 activity.

BUS 207. Legal Responsibilities of Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Examination of the American legal system and important legal principles for business operations, such as those involved with contracts, torts, agency, business organizations, and employment. Emphasis on how legal principles help define socially responsible conduct. Case studies. 4 lectures.

BUS 212. Financial Accounting for Nonbusiness Majors. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Introduction to financial accounting theory and practice with an emphasis on financial statement preparation and analysis. Not open to Business majors. 4 lectures.

BUS 214. Financial Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Principles of financial accounting for Business majors. The course prepares students to understand and interpret financial statement information. Financial reporting standards are explored to give students an understanding of how financial events are reflected in financial statements. 4 lectures.

BUS 215. Managerial Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency in electronic spreadsheet, word processing, and presentation applications; BUS 212 or BUS 214 or equivalent.

Applications of accounting for making business decisions. Content includes planning and control issues including cost behavior, budget preparation, performance reporting; addresses social responsibility and employee motivational and behavioral considerations. Preparation of spreadsheet applications useful for decision-making. 4 lectures.

BUS 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

BUS 290. Introduction to Systems Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Fundamentals of computer programming related to business applications. Application development using graphical user interface controls, variables, data types, and input/output with text files. 4 lectures.

BUS 301. Global Financial Institutions and Markets. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: ECON 222.

Role of private and public financial institutions in allocating capital globally and promoting international commerce. Financial institutions covered include the FED, IMF, World Bank, investment banks and others. Detailed exploration of the history and functions of these institutions. 4 lectures.

BUS 302. International and Cross Cultural Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: GE Area A, C1, C2, D1-D4.

Dimensions of culture and its variations within and across nations. Impact of culture on managing in a global context. Development of managerial competencies requisite to working in and supervising multicultural groups in international corporations. Frameworks for analyzing cultural and contextual influences on organizational behavior, culture shock and readjustment, expatriation and repatriation, cultural change and innovation, intercultural conflict, and ethical dilemmas. Case studies, behavioral simulations, self-assessments and fieldwork. 4 lectures.

BUS 303. Introduction to International Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ECON 222.

Special terms, concepts, and institutions associated with the environment in which international companies operate. Students will be enabled to understand, analyze and offer solutions to global business problems. 4 lectures.

BUS 304. Establishing International Supply Chains. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Recommended: ECON 201 or ECON 221 or ECON 222.

Development of effective supply chains that cross national boundaries with specific examples of import/export between the United States and target country. Study tour to target country as an essential course activity. Pre-trip lectures, readings and assignments; on-the-road business tours, and post-trip import-export proposal. Conducted in English; no prior international business or travel experience required. Passport and Visa required. Schedule of Classes will list country selected. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

BUS 306. Business Professionalism and Career Readiness II. 1 unit

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 206.

Continuation of BUS 206, with interpersonal leadership, networking, business communication, salary and benefit negotiations, and professional image management. Credit/No Credit grading only. 1 activity.

BUS 308. Business Law II. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: BUS 207 or equivalent.

Legal aspects of management decisions, including problems arising in sales, commercial paper, personal property and bailments, secured transactions, bankruptcy, and securities regulation, with emphasis on the uniform commercial code. Case studies. 4 lectures.

BUS 310. Introduction to Entrepreneurship. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: GE Area A.

Role and impact of entrepreneurship; characteristics and traits of entrepreneurs; social, economic, cultural and policy conditions conducive to entrepreneurship; entrepreneurial thinking; opportunity identification and assessment; the management team; organizational and legal issues; business models; acquiring social and financial capital; managing startup to growth; entrepreneurial behavior in existing organizations; realizing and harvesting value. 4 lectures.

BUS 311. Managing Technology in the International Legal Environment. 4 units

GE Area D5

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Areas A, D1 and D2.

Analysis of U.S. and international laws regarding technological innovations from economic, social and political perspectives. Copyrights, patents, trademarks, trade secrets, contracts, products liability and privacy. The Internet, computer programs and biotechnology. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE Area D5 except for Business Administration majors.

BUS 319. Accounting Information Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 214 or Accounting minors with credit in AGB 214.

Comprehensive coverage of manual and computerized accounting processes and internal controls. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

BUS 320. Federal Income Taxation for Individuals. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 319 or consent of instructor.

Federal income taxation and planning for individuals. Federal role of taxation in the business decision-making process. Issues related to individual income tax preparation and introduction to basic property transactions. 4 lectures.

BUS 321. Intermediate Accounting I. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 319.

Comprehensive coverage of financial reporting issues. Covers financial statements, assets other than investments and intangibles, and liabilities. 4 lectures.

BUS 322. Intermediate Accounting II. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 321 with minimum grade of C-; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Comprehensive coverage of financial reporting issues. Covers investments, intangibles, equities, revenue recognition and the Cash Flows Statement. 4 lectures.

BUS 342. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 214 with a grade of C- or better, or consent of instructor; and STAT 252 or any 300 level statistics course.

Theory and applications of financing business operations. Financial management of current and fixed assets from internal and external sources. Analysis, planning, control, and problem solving. Some discussion of corporate social responsibility in the context of corporate objective functions. The use of technology in the form of financial calculators and/or spreadsheets. 4 lectures.

BUS 346. Principles of Marketing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: ECON 222 with a grade of C- or better for Business Administration and Economics majors; or ECON 201 with a grade of C- or better for Industrial Technology majors; or ECON 201 or ECON 222 with a grade of C- or better for all other majors; or consent of instructor.

Development of an understanding of the marketing process: identifying target markets; developing and launching products or services; and managing pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies. 2 lectures, 2 discussions.

BUS 382. Organizations, People, and Technology. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: GE Area A, C1, C2, D1-D4; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Evaluation of macro dimensions of business organizations including environment, mission, goals, strategies, structure, people, technology, and internal management systems and processes. Case analysis, experiential class activities. Application to business solutions in technology-oriented settings. 4 lectures.

BUS 384. Human Resources Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: GE Area A, C1, C2, D1-D4.

Introduction to functional areas of the discipline including staffing, compensation, employee development and labor relations. Additional workplace issues addressed include performance and human capital management, employer legal and social responsibility for employee wellbeing, managing a diverse/global workforce, and using human resource information systems. 4 lectures.

BUS 386. Employee Training and Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 384.

Needs assessment, including organization, person, and task or competency analysis. Design, delivery and evaluation of employee training and human resource development in knowledge-based organizational settings. Performance management and feedback systems; development of learning organizations; human resource information systems (HRIS) applications in career management and training administration. 4 lectures.

BUS 387. Organizational Behavior. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: GE Area A, ECON 221 and BUS 207. Recommended: STAT 252.

Application of behavioral, social and organizational science concepts to management. Exploration of the interactions between individuals and the organizations in which they work and live. Individual, interpersonal, team, intergroup and organizational levels of analysis included in topics such as expectations, perception, communications, creativity, leadership style, cultural and ethical behavior, group dynamics, team effectiveness and work design. 4 lectures.

BUS 391. Information Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: BUS 214.

Computer applications in business and industry. Information systems and integrated systems concepts, computer hardware and software, strategic uses of information systems, databases, data warehousing, decision support systems and artificial intelligence, network basics, electronic commerce, systems development, ethical use of information, employing technology in a socially responsible manner, and emerging trends and technologies in information systems. 4 lectures.

BUS 392. Business Application Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 391.

The fundamental concepts and models of application development needed to understand the key processes related to building functioning business applications and appreciate the complexity of application development. The concepts of computer programming, data structures, problem solving, programming logic, and fundamental design techniques. Up-to-date application development tools and technologies currently used by business enterprises. 4 lectures.

BUS 393. Database Systems in Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Corequisite: BUS 392; Business and Economics majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Design, development, testing, and implementation of databases for business applications. Data modeling with entity relationship diagrams (ERD) and class diagrams (UML). Data normalization, data integrity, the effect of business rules on data normalization. Advanced queries using structured query language (SQL). Database application development culminating in a database project. 4 lectures.

BUS 394. System Analysis and Design. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: BUS 391; Business and Economics majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Systems analysis and design. Project team creation and performance monitoring. Systems development life cycle and project management, process modeling using data flow diagrams, data modeling with Entity/Relationship (E/R) diagrams, Computer Assisted Software Engineering (CASE) tools, object modeling with Unified Modeling Language (UML), and prototype development. 4 lectures.

BUS 395. Systems Design and Implementation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: BUS 394 (with a minimum grade of C- or better).

Systems design and implementation, with focus on project management and incorporating software quality into the software development process, including software testing. 4 lectures.

BUS 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4 units.

BUS 401. General Management and Strategy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342, BUS 346, BUS 387, BUS 391, senior standing, and completion of one of the following: IT 303, IT 326, IT 330, IT 341, or IT 371.

Application of interdisciplinary skills to business and corporate strategy analysis formulation and implementation of business, corporate and global level strategies. Consideration of interdependence between external environments and internal systems. Focus on responsibilities, tasks, and skills of general managers, including socially responsible behavior and governance. Case studies, group problem solving, experiential class activities. Capstone course of Business core curriculum. 4 seminars.

BUS 402. International Business Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 342, BUS 346, BUS 387 or consent of instructor.

Managerial concepts and techniques for analysis and decision making within international businesses. Environmental and organizational factors influencing multinational operations. Assessing international market opportunities and entry modes. Complexities of multinational management strategy, structure and systems, especially during initial stages of internationalization. Case studies and simulations. 4 lectures.

BUS 403. Advanced Seminar in International Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 302 and BUS 402; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Integration of management concepts within complex multinational organizations. Interdisciplinary approach to identifying and assessing multinational and global competitive environments and strategies; structuring and managing interdependent multinational operations; addressing conflicts between domestic and international policies and practices in multinational enterprises. Case studies, simulations, group analysis and problem solving. 4 seminars.

BUS 404. Governmental and Social Influences on Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 207 and ECON 222.

Analysis from legal, economic, political, and ethical perspectives, of the changing domestic and international environments of the business enterprise. Topics include administrative law, agencies and regulatory policy, antitrust law, public policy analysis, business-government relations, and corporate responsibility. Case studies. 4 lectures.

BUS 405. Joint Ventures and Alliances. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 342, BUS 346, and BUS 387.

Examination of joint ventures and alliances between organizations, using cross-cultural, interdisciplinary perspective. Alliance motives, types and traits. Processes for partner selection, negotiation, structure, operation, and performance assessment of international and cross-cultural alliances. Lectures, case studies, and simulation. 4 lectures.

BUS 406. Managing Mergers, Acquisitions and Divestitures. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 342, BUS 346, and BUS 387.

Issues associated with analyzing, negotiating, and managing mergers, acquisitions and divestitures (MADS) using cross-cultural, interdisciplinary perspective. Rationale for decision to pursue MADS and processes for identifying targets; valuing and negotiating MADS; staffing and human resource management issues; strategic control and integration; and cross-cultural conflict and divided loyalties in domestic and international MADS. Lectures, case studies and simulation. 4 lectures.

BUS 407. Managing People in Global Markets. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 387.

Impact of cultural and strategic differences on management of people in multinational organizations. Critical human resource issues in domestic and international operations. 4 lectures.

BUS 409. Law of Real Property. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Legal problems of acquisition, ownership and transfer of real property. Contracts, agency, estates, and co-ownership, mortgages and deeds, covenants, conditions, and restrictions, easements, landlord-tenant, and zoning. 4 lectures.

BUS 410. The Legal Environment of International Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: BUS 207 and ECON 222.

U.S., foreign, and international law affecting international business transactions. U.S. and foreign cultural, ethical, and political norms and legal institutions, and their effect on law and business. 4 lectures.

BUS 412. Advanced Managerial Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 215.

Product costing systems including hybrid costing systems, management control systems, cost allocation, activity based costing, cost information for decision making, new manufacturing environments, and strategic control systems. International dimension integrated in the course content. 4 lectures.

BUS 416. Volunteer Income Tax Assistance - Senior Project. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: BUS 320 or equivalent, senior standing.

Training and practice in the preparation of state and federal individual income tax returns. Coverage of the deductions and credits applicable to individuals. Students provide free tax assistance and income tax preparation to community residents under the supervision of qualified professionals. 2 lectures, 2 activities.

BUS 417. Taxation of Corporations and Partnerships. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: BUS 320 or equivalent.

Comparative study of the taxation of C corporations and flow-through tax entities, including S corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies. 4 lectures.

BUS 418. Listening to the Customer. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: For GRC Majors, GRC 361; for all other majors, BUS 346.

Discovery and development of customer insights based on a project-oriented introduction to the research process. Development of research questions, and design and application of multiple research methods (e.g. secondary, observation, interview, focus group, and survey research). Exploratory and confirmatory approaches leading to the analysis, interpretation, and presentation of results. 4 lectures.

BUS 419. Strategic Marketing Measurement. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 418, STAT 252; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Development of skills to gather, analyze, and report information critical for marketing decision making. Focus on primary data collection and analytical techniques (e.g. experimental design, descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation, ANOVA, and regression). Other methods may include data mining, GIS, and customer relationship management (CRM). 4 lectures.

BUS 421. Marketing Analytics and Business Intelligence. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 419.

Analysis of customer information using a broad range of tools and techniques. Application of analytic findings to marketing decision-making. Integration of data into reporting platforms that emphasize return on marketing investment. 4 lectures.

BUS 422. Accounting for Government and Not-For-Profit Entities. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 321.

Accounting and reporting by state and local governments and not-for-profit entities. State and local governmental topics include: fund structures, budgetary accounting, the modified accrual basis of accounting, reporting concepts and practices, contributions, restricted resources, endowments. 4 lectures.

BUS 424. Accounting Ethics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Study of professional values underlying the accounting profession. Methods for incorporation of ethical reasoning into accounting decision-making. Rose of accounting ethics in development of financial statements. 4 lectures.

BUS 425. Auditing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 322.

Survey of the auditing environment including institutional, ethical, and legal liability dimensions. Introduction to audit planning, assessing materiality and audit risk, collecting and evaluating audit evidence, considering the internal control structure, substantive testing, and reporting. 4 lectures.

BUS 430. Internship/Cooperative Education. 2-12 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Approval of area chair, junior standing, and a CPSLO cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 without being on academic probation.

Work experience in business, industry, government and other areas of student career interest. Periodic written progress reports, final report, and evaluation by work supervisor required. Credit/No Credit grading. Major credit limited to 4 units; total credit limited to 12 units.

BUS 431. Security Analysis and Portfolio Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342, ECON 339, or STAT 324; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

In-depth analysis of equity market and its instruments. Detailed study of leading stock valuation models. Impact of changes in the firm's fundamentals and in macroeconomic factors on stock prices. Brief introduction to equity and index derivatives. 4 lectures.

BUS 432. Insurance Planning and Risk Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

Introduction to insurance planning and risk management and its role in financial planning. Key concepts include determining risk exposure and selecting insurance products. Legal aspects of property and liability policy, life, health, and social insurance. 4 lectures.

BUS 433. International Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 431 or BUS 439.

Financial management of international business. International capital and money markets, international financial institutions, special problems in evaluating direct foreign investment, and financial techniques used in international business operations. 4 lectures.

BUS 434. Real Estate Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

Analyses of real estate financing techniques and funding sources for development projects. Effects of federal, state, and local taxes on real estate investments. In-depth investigation and computer analyses of real estate investment projects. 4 lectures.

BUS 435. Real Estate Investment. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

Intensive investigation and computer analysis of real estate investment opportunities. Problems in real estate and property management. 4 lectures.

BUS 436. Entrepreneurial Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

Process of financing new and fast-growing firms. Readings on the venture capital process, from seed capital through the initial public offering. Valuation of firms seeking venture capital, and those planning their initial public offering. Valuing convertible securities. Real options valuation. 4 seminars.

BUS 437. Retirement and Estate Planning. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

Retirement planning and employee benefits; Social Security and Medicare; types of retirement plans; qualified plan characteristics; distribution options; and group insurance benefits. Trusts, power of attorney, and probate. 4 lectures.

BUS 438. Advanced Corporate Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 431 and BUS 439.

Corporate finance with an emphasis on managing the corporation to create shareholder value. Detailed treatment of topics such as capital budgeting, capital structure, economic value-added, corporate distribution policy, financial distress, and mergers and acquisitions. 4 lectures.

BUS 439. Fixed Income Securities Market. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 342; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Development of analytical skills for properly valuing fixed income securities. Bond pricing, yields, and volatility; interest rate term structure and yield curve; securities, market structure, and analytical techniques; bond portfolio strategies and an introduction to interest rate derivatives. 4 lectures.

BUS 441. Computer Applications in Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

A combination lecture/computer lab course focusing on computer acquisition of financial data and the subsequent application of financial theory and analysis to this data so as to facilitate financial decision making. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

BUS 442. Introduction to Futures and Options. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: BUS 431.

An in-depth analysis of derivatives markets and instruments. Emphasis on the valuation of futures, options, swaps, and other derivative securities. 4 seminars.

BUS 443. Case Studies in Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: BUS 431 or BUS 439.

Development of analytical and decision-making techniques in applying financial theory to business management problems. Emphasizes working capital management, financial analysis and forecasting, mergers and acquisitions, and other current topics in finance, including financial ethics. Cases are used to emphasize practical problems. 4 lectures.

BUS 444. Financial Engineering and Risk Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: BUS 431.

Advanced course synthesizing concepts from corporate finance, derivative securities, statistics, and computer science. Emphasis on both computer programming in a matrix programming language (Matlab) to solve practical risk management and valuation problems, and analytical training in the area of stochastic calculus, and its application to derivative security pricing. Practical applications of derivatives for controlling risk in an international corporate environment. 4 lectures.

BUS 445. Ethics and Behavior Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: BUS 342.

Contemporary theoretical and empirical issues including agency theory, reputation building, game theory, and financial ethics. Discussion of the application of ethics theory to financial decisions. May include lectures, case analyses, student presentations, and guest speakers. 4 lectures.

BUS 446. International Marketing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 346.

Development of an understanding of global marketing strategy. Acquisition of information about international markets and its use to describe customers, understand markets, and make marketing mix decisions. 4 lectures.

BUS 451. New Product Development and Launch. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 418, STAT 252; Business and Economics majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Project-based skills for developing new products and planning for their launch. Major phases of product development: product innovation strategy, idea generation and screening, concept development and testing, technology drivers. Introduction to product launch, including segmentation, targeting, positioning, pricing, and branding. 4 lectures.

BUS 452. Product Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 419 or BUS 421.

Development of individual and project-based skills in managing products in the growth, maturity, and decline stages of their life cycles. Emphasis on distribution, pricing, and communication strategies required to maintain distinctive product advantages. May include developing a comprehensive communication plan and acquiring market-tracking skills. 4 lectures.

BUS 453. Digital and New Media Marketing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisites: BUS 418; GRC 201 or GRC 377; JOUR 331; and JOUR 342.

Definitions, scope, phases, and tools of digital and new media marketing communications. Planning integrated marketing communications in a systematic way across digital tools and new media channels that reflect a client organization's strategy for managing its identity, image, and reputation. 4 lectures.

BUS 454. Marketing Projects. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 451 and BUS 452.

Client-based course providing an opportunity to apply marketing abilities. Teams draw upon research, analytical, and strategic marketing skills to develop an actionable plan that addresses a critical marketing challenge faced by an organization. Deliverables include research findings and written and verbal presentation to the organization and instructor. 4 lectures.

BUS 455. Marketing Strategy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 451 and BUS 452.

Integration of key marketing concepts using tools such as computer simulations, readings, and/or case studies. Development and implementation of strategic and tactical decisions for companies and brands. 4 lectures.

BUS 459. Social Media's Role in Integrated Marketing Communications. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 453.

Integrative project experience in social media marketing and/or integrative marketing communications campaign: research target markets, identify appropriate social media and other media channels. Field trips required. 4 seminars.

BUS 461. Senior Project I. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and analysis of a problem under faculty supervision. Problems typical of those which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Formal report is required. Minimum 120 hours total time.

BUS 462. Senior Project II. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and analysis of a problem under faculty supervision. Problems typical of those which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Formal report is required. Minimum 120 hours total time.

BUS 463. Senior Project: Applied Accounting, Auditing and Tax Research. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Senior standing, BUS 322 and Graduation Writing Requirement.

Practice with multiple authoritative accounting, auditing and tax databases, actual published financial reports, actual tax returns, and business writing. Real world accounting, auditing and tax issues. Activity will include participation in the Low Income Taxpayer Clinic.

BUS 464. Applied Senior Project Seminar. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and analysis of business problems and opportunities in directed individual or group-based projects. Problems typical to those which graduates could encounter in their fields of employment. Formal report required. 4 seminars.

BUS 466. Senior Project: Sales Development Program. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: AGB 309 or BUS 346; and Senior standing.

Develop selling skills, create a sales portfolio, participate in sales role plays and sales competition, observe a salesperson in action, and explore selling as a career. Formal report required. 4 seminars.

BUS 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1-4 lectures.

BUS 471. Compensation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 384 and STAT 252, or equivalent.

Design and management of compensation systems. Job analysis, job evaluation, wage and salary surveys, incentive systems, gainsharing, benefit administration, pay equity and legal regulation. Simulation and case study development of a wage structure, pay level and individual raise policies, administrative controls, salary and program budgets. 4 lectures.

BUS 472. Labor Relations. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 384 or equivalent.

Union organizing. Negotiation and administration of collective agreements. Simulation of bargaining, grievance, and arbitration processes. 4 lectures.

BUS 473. Employment Law. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 207, BUS 384 or equivalent.

Federal and state labor policy as expressed in common law, relevant statutes, and executive orders. Effects upon employees, management, protected groups, and the public. Current rules analyzed in a contemporary and historical context. Understanding important workplace and employment problems. 4 lectures.

BUS 474. Independent Study in Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 322.

Individual investigation, research, study or survey of selected topics in accounting, auditing or taxation. Total credit limited to 8 units, repeatable in the same term. Class Schedule will list topic selected.

BUS 475. Staffing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 384 and STAT 252, or equivalent.

Processes by which individuals and organizations become matched to form the employment relationship. Specific issues related to human resources planning, internal and external recruitment and selection. 4 lectures.

BUS 477. Managing Change and Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 387 or BUS 382 or consent of instructor.

Analysis of development and trends in the field of organization change and development. Application of behavioral and organizational science knowledge and social technology to growth and change of organizations for the purpose of improving effectiveness and sustainability. 4 seminars.

BUS 478. Organization Design. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 382 or consent of instructor.

Impact of changing business environment and strategy on design of organizations. Organization design programs, including design models, redesign processes, and guiding principles. Case studies, current redesign projects and field studies. 4 lectures.

BUS 486. Human Resource Information Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 384 and BUS 391.

Application of computers to the management of human resources. Human resource decision support systems and routine transaction processing. Ethical use of information systems in managing the human resource function. Basic system design decisions. Use of information systems to support traditional human resource functional areas. Exposure to enterprise-wide, integrated software. 4 lectures.

BUS 488. Planning and Managing New Ventures. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: BUS 215, BUS 310, BUS 342, BUS 346 and BUS 436; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

The purpose and process of business planning and the challenges of managing a start-up enterprise. Preparation of a complete business plan: management and organization; product or service; marketing; finance; operating and control systems; growth. 4 seminars.

BUS 489. Negotiation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 387.

Theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of professional and managerial contexts (e.g., labor relations, business acquisitions, compensation, business disputes) and in one-on-one, group, and team-based arrangements. Includes impact of culture, ethics, dispute resolution, coalitions and use of creativity to develop integrative solutions. 4 lectures.

BUS 491. Decision Support Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: BUS 391, STAT 251 or equivalent; Business and Economics majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Modeling organizational systems and processes such as computer networks, transportation systems, manufacturing systems, retail systems, etc. Developing computer simulation models and animation of systems to provide decision support in selecting system design alternatives. Applying quantitative methods to model uncertainty and conduct statistical performance analysis. 4 lectures.

BUS 494. Integrated Information Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: BUS 391; Business and Economics majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Information systems in an integrated business environment. Collaborative learning with teams analyzing, designing, implementing and evaluating enterprise software. Determine and implement organizational policies and procedures to assure system performance. Coverage of business processes in the areas of accounting, procurement, human resource, production customer relationship and supply chain management. Ethical use of information systems in managing businesses. Role of information systems in conducting business in a socially responsible manner. 4 lectures.

BUS 495. Software Testing. 4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: BUS 392.

Theory and practice of software testing, including state-of-the-art practices, design issues, staffing issues, test management issues, and other related areas. Software testing tools utilized for applications testing, and test management. 4 lectures.

BUS 496. Electronic Commerce. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: BUS 392.

Focus on the technology of electronic commerce, including programming, development environments and security, through a series of lectures, guest speakers, demonstrations, exercises and case studies. Networking, client/server computing, and web/database design concepts. Working e-commerce application required at end of course. 4 lectures.

BUS 498. Directed Topics in Information Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: BUS 392.

Specialized Information Systems (IS) topic selected from the IS areas of current interest. Intended for advanced IS concentration students who want to learn and acquire in-depth IS knowledge and skills. The Schedule of Classes will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 4 lectures.

BUS 499. Data Communications and Networking. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 391; Business and Economics majors must declare their concentrations in order to enroll.

Combines the fundamental concepts of data communications and networking with practical applications in business. Provides a basic understanding of the technical and managerial aspects of business telecommunication. Introduction to data communications and applications and technical fundamentals, and to network products, technologies, applications, and services. 4 lectures.

ECON Courses

ECON 200. Special Problems for Undergraduates. 1-2 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4 units, with a maximum of 2 units per quarter.

ECON 201. Survey of Economics. 4 units

GE Area D2

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Basic principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics. Emphasis on applications to current national and global economic issues. For majors requiring one quarter of economics. Not open to students having previous credit in ECON 222 or equivalent. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ECON/HNRS 201. Fulfills GE D2.

ECON 221. Microeconomics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Microeconomic principles. Marginal and equilibrium analysis of commodity and factor markets in determination of price and output. Normative issues of efficiency and equity. 4 lectures.

ECON 222. Macroeconomics. 4 units

GE Area D2

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Introduction to economic problems. Macroeconomic analysis and principles. Aggregate output, employment, prices, and economic policies for changing these variables. International trade and finance. Issues of economic growth and development. Comparative economic systems and economies in transition. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE D2.

ECON 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

ECON 303. Economics of Poverty, Discrimination and Immigration. 4 units

GE Area D5; USCP

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Areas A, D1, and either ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 201.

Economic analysis of the cause, extent and impact of poverty, discrimination and immigration and of the policies designed to address these socioeconomic issues. Emphasis on the experience of African-Americans, Latinos, and women in the United States. 4 lectures. Crosslisted as ECON/HNRS 303. Fulfills GE D5 except for Economics majors. Fulfills USCP.

ECON 304. Comparative Economic Systems. 4 units

GE Area D5

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Areas A, D3, and either ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 201.

Analysis of economic systems as a set of mechanisms and institutions for decision making, and the implementation of decisions regarding income distribution, the levels of consumption and production, and the level of economic welfare. 4 lectures. Fulfills GE D5 except for Economics majors.

ECON 311. Intermediate Microeconomics I. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: ECON 201; or ECON 221 and ECON 222; and MATH 141 or MATH 221.

Consumer behavior and the theory of demand; production, cost, supply functions; perfect competition; monopoly and oligopoly; labor markets. 4 lectures.

ECON 312. Intermediate Microeconomics II. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: ECON 311.

Game theory; risk, uncertainty and information; choice over time; asset markets; general equilibrium; welfare economics, externalities and public goods. 4 lectures.

ECON 313. Intermediate Macroeconomics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Corequisite: ECON 311.

Analysis of national income, price level, employment, international trade and economic growth. Development of the theory of national income determination. Evaluation of roles of monetary and fiscal policy. 4 lectures.

ECON 325. Economics of Development and Growth. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Completion of GE Areas A, D3, and either ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 201.

Analysis of the economy of less developed countries, and a survey of public policies designed to stimulate economic growth and reduce poverty. Topics include financing development, technology, population problems, human capital, rural and urban development, trade policy and the economic relationships between developed and developing nations. 4 lectures.

ECON 330. International Trade Theory. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Either ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 201.

Theory of comparative advantage, gains from trade, and recent developments in trade theory; examination of tariffs, quotas, exchange controls, other trade barriers and underlying policy issues; review of U.S. commercial policy, GATT, the common market, regional and world economic organizations. 4 lectures. Not open to students with credit in ECON 404 or equivalent.

ECON 337. Money, Banking and Credit. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Either ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 201.

Financial markets and institutions. Structure of the banking industry and impacts of technological change in banking. Structure and operations of the Federal Reserve. Impacts of monetary policy on the economy. 4 lectures.

ECON 339. Econometrics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: either ECON 221 and ECON 222; or ECON 201; MATH 141 or MATH 221, and STAT 252 or STAT 302.

Application of statistical methods useful in economics. General linear regression model. Specific issues and problems related to economic models: multicollinearity, autocorrelation, heteroscedasticity, dummy variables, lagged variables, and simultaneous equation estimation. Application and evaluation of selected examples of empirical economic research. Microcomputer applications. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ECON 340. Advanced Econometrics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: ECON 339, and either ECON 221 and ECON 222, or ECON 201, or consent of instructor.

Advanced topics in undergraduate econometrics. Single equation estimation topics including: distributed lag models, causality, cointegration and error correction models and nonlinear estimation. Forecasting with a single equation model. Simultaneous equation estimation, including instrumental variables, two stage least squares and seemingly unrelated regression. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ECON 400. Special Problems. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 4 units.

ECON 403. Industrial Organization. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: ECON 312.

Application of basic tools of economics to American Industry. Case studies of individual firms and industries. Performance of various business structures, such as monopoly and oligopoly. Effects of government regulation and antitrust policy. 4 lectures.

ECON 404. International Trade Theory. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: ECON 312.

Theory of comparative advantage, neoclassical model of trade, offer curves and terms of trade, edgeworth boxes, valuation of factor inputs, effects of migration and mobility of funds, emerging growth and trade distortions, welfare effects of trade, and recent developments in trade theory. 4 lectures.

ECON 405. International Monetary Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: ECON 313.

Nature of international payments, U.S. balance of payments. Theory and practice of foreign exchange rate determination under the gold standard, paper standard, and IMF system; international money and capital markets; problems of international liquidity and monetary stability. 4 lectures.

ECON 406. Applied Forecasting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: ECON 311 and ECON 339, or consent of instructor.

Causes and measurement of business fluctuations. Techniques of forecasting with microcomputer applications. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

ECON 408. Mathematical Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: ECON 313, or consent of instructor.

Applications of quantitative techniques to topics in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory. Use of multivariate calculus and linear algebra in formulating static economic models. Applications of statistical inference, estimation and forecasting in economic models. 4 lectures.

ECON 409. Probability Models for Economic Decisions. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: ECON 312.

Decision making in complex, realistic situations. Simulation of random variables in Excel. Risk aversion. Subjective assessment of probabilities and correlations. Decision trees. Optimal bidding in auctions. The winner's curse. Moral hazard and risk sharing. Repeated investment decisions under risk. 4 lectures.

ECON 410. Public Finance and Cost-Benefit Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: ECON 312 or graduate standing.

Principles of rational decision making with respect to government revenues and spending. Measurement of costs and benefits, and criterion selection. Taxation, user fees, deficit financing, public goods, neighborhood effects and zoning. Microcomputer applications. 4 lectures.

ECON 413. Labor Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: ECON 312.

Wage determination theory, basic economic factors that affect the labor movement, economic impact of union activities on employment, output, income, wages, prices, and national economic policy. 4 lectures.

ECON 417. Development of Economic Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: ECON 311, or consent of instructor.

Analysis of ideas related to the development of economic theory in the Western civilization from the Greeks through the classical, neoclassical, and Keynesian to the current post-Keynesian concepts. 4 lectures.

ECON 424. Monetary Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: ECON 313.

The role of money in our economy. Focus on the links between monetary policy, interest rates, prices, housing markets, mortgage lending and overall economic activity. Public policy issues relating to real estate markets. 4 lectures.

ECON 431. Environmental Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: ECON 312.

Economic dimensions of environmental abuse and protection. Use of simple economic models in developing and evaluating environmental policies. Overview of current environmental problems. Issues related to the sustainability of economic growth at the national and international levels. 4 lectures.

ECON 432. Economics of Energy and Resources. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: ECON 312 or graduate standing.

Economic theory and public policies as applied to problems of natural resources and energy. Dynamic resource and energy models developed with reference to public and private sector growth. Application of the principles of capital theory emphasized. Case studies. Computer software applications in the study of natural resources and energy under uncertainty. 4 lectures.

ECON 434. Urban Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: ECON 312.

Application of basic tools of economic analysis to problems of urban regions. Causes and possible cures for inadequate growth rate, income levels, and the quality of life in urban regions. 4 lectures.

ECON 435. Economics of Land and Water. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: ECON 312 or graduate standing.

Economic analysis of natural resource issues, policies and management with an emphasis on land and water use decisions in the western U.S. Urban demand for water; water supply and economic growth; economic impacts of surface water law and institutions; economics of land management. 4 lectures.

ECON 460. Research Methodology in Applied Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: ECON 313; ECON 339 and Senior standing.

Theory and practice of the development of economic analysis. Steps in the formulation and execution of an economics research project. 4 lectures.

ECON 461. Senior Project I. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: ECON 313 and senior standing.

Selection and analysis of a problem under faculty supervision. Problems typical of those which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Formal report is required. Minimum 120 hours total time.

ECON 462. Senior Project II. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: ECON 313 and senior standing.

Selection and analysis of a problem under faculty supervision. Problems typical of those which graduates must solve in their fields of employment. Formal report is required. Minimum 120 hours total time.

ECON 464. Applied Senior Project. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: ECON 313 and senior standing.

Analysis of selected economic topics and problems in directed individual or group-based projects, which require application of economic models, principles and theory to investigate important business, economic or social issues. Formal report required. 4 seminars.

ECON 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

GSA Courses

GSA 501. Graduate Accounting Individual Research. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing in Accounting and formal petition with approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced individual research in accounting topics planned and completed under the direction of a member of the college faculty. Designed to meet the needs of qualified students who wish to pursue investigations in accounting which cannot be followed effectively in regularly offered elective courses. A formal written proposal must be accepted by the Associate Dean of OCOB before work begins.

GSA 536. Taxation of Trusts, Estates, and Transfer Taxes. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Income taxation of trusts and estates as flow-through entities; transfer taxation of gifts and estates, including generation-skipping transfers. 4 lectures.

GSA 537. State and Local Taxation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Multi-state income and franchise taxation; property taxes; sales and use taxes; and the constitutional authority for the imposition of state taxes. 4 lectures.

GSA 538. Current Developments in Taxation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Current developments in income taxation of individuals, trusts and estates and business entities; transfer taxation of gifts and estates; and ethics and professional responsibility in taxation. 4 lectures.

GSA 539. Clinical Tax Education Internship. 9 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing in Specialization in Tax, MS Accounting program.

Accounting internship that allows graduate level accounting students the opportunity to apply skills and competencies to an employment opportunity. Placement in a full-time supervised work experience at a public accounting firm or in an accounting or internal audit department of a private enterprise or government agency. Credit/No Credit grading only.

GSA 540. Taxation of Corporations and Partnerships. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Comparative study of the taxation of C corporations and flow-through tax entities, including S corporations, partnerships and limited liability companies. Not open to students with credit in BUS 417. 4 lectures.

GSA 541. Advanced Financial Reporting Issues I. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Comprehensive coverage of selected advanced financial accounting and reporting topics. Topics include accounting changes and errors, leases, pensions and other post-employment benefits, income taxes, and consolidated financial statements. 4 seminars.

GSA 543. Advanced Financial Reporting Issues II. 5 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: GSA 541 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Comprehensive coverage of selected advanced financial accounting and reporting topics. Topics include financial statement footnote and MD&A disclosures and coverage of SEC statutes, regulations and filing forms. 5 seminars.

GSA 544. Advanced Enterprise Wide Business Processes for Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Study of various transactions in order to understand the underlying business processes and information flows between various business units, in order for a transaction to occur and be properly reported, and the information determined that is critical for the information system to capture. Emphasis of role of information systems in controlling the authorization of transactions, access to information, access to assets, preparation of accounting records and reports. 3 seminars, 1 activity.

GSA 545. Applied Accounting Research and Communications. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced use of authoritative accounting and auditing data bases and actual filings by public companies. Frequent writing and speaking exercises. Real world accounting and auditing issues facing public and private enterprises. In-depth coverage of federal and state regulation of securities transactions.

GSA 546. Tax Research and Administrative Procedures. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Research techniques applicable to tax issues including the communication of research results. Administrative procedures necessary for tax compliance with the various tax jurisdictions with primary emphasis on IRS practices. 2 seminars, 2 activities.

GSA 548. Advanced Individual Taxation and Tax Planning. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced concepts concerning the impact of taxes on individuals. Introduction to transfer taxes imposed on individuals. Financial, estate and compensation tax planning issues. 4 seminars.

GSA 549. Advanced Taxation of Flow-Through Entities. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced and special topics related to the income tax treatment of partnerships, limited liability companies, trusts and S corporations and their owners and beneficiaries. Creation, operation, liquidation and sale of such organizations. 4 seminars.

GSA 550. Advanced Corporate Taxation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced and special topics related to the income tax treatment of regular corporations and their shareholders. Mergers and acquisitions, tax accounting methods and periods, cross-boundary topics, and current issues. 4 seminars.

GSA 551. International Taxation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Corequisite: BUS 417, or BUS 414 and BUS 415, and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Fundamental tax concepts of inbound and outbound investments of U.S. taxpayers, controlled foreign corporations, Subpart F, the foreign tax credit, transfer pricing and contracting country treaties. 4 lectures.

GSA 552. Fraud Auditing and Examination. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Occupational and financial statement fraud; particular emphasis on the breakdown of corporate governance and ethics systems and developing internal control systems to prevent and detect fraudulent activities. 4 lectures.

GSA 553. International Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

International accounting, auditing, and corporate governance standards including international financial reporting standards (IFRS). 4 lectures.

GSA 554. Advanced Spreadsheet Modeling for Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced topics in electronic spreadsheets and their use in accounting and financial applications. Developing spreadsheet models for data analysis and decision making. Integrating automation tools and external data sources into spreadsheets.4 lectures.

GSA 555. Database Modeling and Analysis for Accounting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Fundamental concepts in database analysis, design, implementation, administration, and audit including issues such as requirements specification, REA modeling, ER modeling, normalization, SQL, transaction control, database security, and query optimization. May also include topics such as data warehouses, XBRL and ebXLM. 4 lectures.

GSA 556. Financial Accounting and Valuation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Comprehensive coverage of approaches to the measurement of fair values that are used in accounting situations such as mergers and acquisitions, recognition of stock based compensation, and determination of impairments in the carrying amounts of long-lived assets including intangible assets and goodwill. Role of financial reporting in the valuation of securities, credit analysis, and the determination of the cost of capital. 4 lectures.

GSA 570. Selected Advanced Topics for Accounting. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Directed group study of selected topics for graduate students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1-4 lectures.

GSB Courses

GSB 500. Independent Study. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing and formal petition with approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced study planned and completed under the direction of the Director of Graduate Programs. Open only to graduate students who have demonstrated ability to do independent work. A formal written proposal must be accepted by the Associate Dean of OCOB Graduate Programs before work begins.

GSB 501. Individual Research. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing and formal petition with approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced individual research planned and completed under the direction of a member of the college faculty. Designed to meet the needs of qualified students who wish to pursue investigations which cannot be followed effectively in regularly offered elective courses. A formal written proposal must be accepted by the Associate Dean of OCOB Graduate Programs before work begins.

GSB 503. Collaborative Industry Project. 1-8 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing and formal petition with approval from the Associate Dean.

Collaborative business project with a client organization that allows graduate level students the opportunity to apply knowledge, skills and competencies to address a business problem. Small teams work in collaboration with a client organization and a faculty advisor. A formal written proposal must be accepted by the Associate Dean of OCOB Graduate Programs before work begins. The project may last up to one year.

GSB 510. Data Visualization and Communication in Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Principles of data visualization and storytelling. Data visualization tools for different types of data in the context of business analytics. Communication of results for business actionable insights. Software use includes Excel, Tableau and R. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

GSB 511. Accounting for Managers. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Emphasis on development of the ability to read and interpret public and internal financial reports. Public reporting responsibilities of companies and management's responsibilities for developing and maintaining effective internal control systems. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

GSB 512. Quantitative Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Focus on a variety of statistical techniques that help to transform data into useful information that can be used to make informed business predictions and decisions. 3 seminars, 1 laboratory.

GSB 513. Organizational Behavior. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Application of behavioral, social and organizational science concepts to management. Individual, team and organizational levels of analysis, including such topics as expectations, perception, motivation, communications, creativity, leadership, cultural and ethical behavior, group dynamics, team effectiveness, work design, organization change and development. 4 seminars.

GSB 514. The Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Legal and regulatory environment in which business operates. Consideration of historical, societal, and global perspectives reflecting political, social and/or economic beliefs and values. Strong emphasis on fundamental concepts of law and analytical tools to understand interaction between law, ethics and management decisions. 4 seminars.

GSB 516. Strategic Marketing Analytics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: GSB 512 or GSE 518 or IME 503.

Analysis of customer information, using a broad range of tools and techniques including predictive, statistical, and optimization models. Integration of data into reporting platforms. Application of findings to marketing decision-making. 4 lectures.

GSB 520. Data Management for Business Analytics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Exploration of data management including relational databases, data warehouses, and NOSQL databases. Foundation for analyzing, designing, implementing and using information repositories in a business environment. Topics include the database development life cycle, data modeling, SQL programming, data quality and integration. 4 lectures.

GSB 522. Advanced Management Information Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Analysis of the challenges, successes, and failures managers face when planning for and implementing information system initiatives, particularly enterprise systems such as supply chain management, customer relationship management and enterprise resource planning systems. Focus on the strategic and operational impact of emerging information technologies in modern day business management. Design and development of knowledge worker applications including database and decision support systems. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

GSB 523. Managerial Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Managerial economics, or microeconomics, focuses on private markets. Choices made by firms and consumers within topics that include demand, supply, efficiency, marketing structure, and government intervention. Development of an analytical framework for analyzing how these topics are important for managers. 4 lectures.

GSB 524. Marketing Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Introduction to marketing management. Concepts and principles necessary to plan, direct and control the product, promotion, distribution and pricing strategies of the firm. 4 lectures.

GSB 525. Project Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Focus on project management tools and processes required to establish priorities for and management of projects within normal and abnormal scope, money and time constraints. Planning, organizational and resource challenges common to a variety of project types. Product life cycle, normal operational, new product introduction and profit oriented product family projects reviewed in service and production environments. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

GSB 526. Knowledge Management and Business Intelligence. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Relationships among knowledge management (KM), knowledge organizations and knowledge workers. Mapping of the field of knowledge management and exploration of the nature and key features of KM. Discussion of knowledge management and business intelligence central themes using case studies; alternative ways to design, implement and improve KM systems in organizations; business intelligence, decision support systems and data warehousing. Integration of querying, reporting, OLAP, data mining and data warehousing functions. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

GSB 528. Commercial Development of Innovative Technologies. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Conceptual business frameworks for commercialization of new and innovative products and technologies. Business aspects of innovative technologies as they relate to core functional areas such as finance, accounting, marketing, operations, and business and intellectual property law. 4 lectures.

GSB 529. Effective Communication Skills for Managers. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Enhancement of business writing and oral presentation skills, organized around two areas: 1) preparing written business documents and reports, and 2) professional oral presentation skills. Preparation of a variety of business reports and documents. Multiple business presentations. 4 lectures.

GSB 530. Data Analytics and Mining for Business. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: GSB 520.

Exploration of the concepts, tools and techniques of data mining in the business context, using case study and problem-solving approaches. Topics include multidimensional data modeling, predictive analytics, pattern discovery, forecasting, text mining, and data visualization. 4 lectures.

GSB 531. Managerial Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Theories, practices and tools of corporate financial decision making. Topics include valuation of fixed income securities and stocks, capital budgeting, capital structure, dividends, and an overview of financial markets and institutions. Introduction to valuation of derivative securities, market efficiency, and agency costs. 4 seminars.

GSB 533. Aggregate Economics Analysis and Policy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Development of the theoretical and empirical framework of the macroeconomy in which businesses must operate. Topics include GDP, inflation, unemployment, interest rates and monetary and fiscal policies. The dynamics of the macroeconomic environment over time. 4 lectures.

GSB 534. Lean Operations Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Introduction to the operations function and its interaction with other areas in an organization. Emphasis on applying lean six sigma thinking to achieve competitive advantage in cost, quality, time, and flexibility in manufacturing and service operations. 4 seminars.

GSB 537. Corporate Governance in Ethical Organizations. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Coverage of mechanisms, at the firm level, that contribute to more effective corporate governance and ethical climate at publicly traded corporations. Topics include role of boards of directors, audit committees, structures and systems that affect ethical climate in organizations. 4 lectures.

GSB 539. Graduate Internship in Business. 2-8 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing and formal petition with approval from the Associate Dean.

Correlation of experience and academic knowledge. Placement in a supervised business or public organization. A formal written proposal must be accepted by the Associate Dean of OCOB Graduate Programs before work begins. Credit/No Credit grading only.

GSB 550. Bayesian Econometrics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: GSE 520.

Introduction to Bayesian econometrics with a focus on business decision making. Making appropriate use of prior information; computation of posterior densities; Bayesian forecasting and policy evaluation; model selection and diagnostic tools; alternative loss functions tailored to specific business applications. 4 lectures.

GSB 555. Negotiation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Theory and practice of negotiation in a variety of professional and managerial contexts (e.g., business acquisitions, compensation, business disputes, transfer pricing, inter- and intra-organizational) and in one-on-one, group, and team-based arrangements. Includes impact of culture, ethics, dispute resolution, coalitions and use of creativity to develop integrative solutions. 4 seminars.

GSB 556. Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Exploration of entrepreneurship with emphasis on the formation and management of new business ventures. Analysis of typical operating problems of these firms and application of appropriate techniques for their solution. 4 seminars.

GSB 562. Seminar in General Management and Strategy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Corequisite: OCOB graduate standing and GSB 511, GSB 513, GSB 523, GSB 531, GSB 533 and either GSB 512 or IME 503; and either GSB 524 or GSB 573; and either GSB 534 or IME 580, or approval from the Associate Dean.

Application of interdisciplinary skills to business and corporate strategy formulation and implementation. Analysis of interdependence between external environments and internal systems. Focus on responsibilities, tasks, and skills of general managers. Case studies, group problem solving. Integrating course of MBA core curriculum. Course satisfies comprehensive examination requirement. 4 seminars.

GSB 563. International Business Tour. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP, SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Business tour exposure to different management systems and their operating environments. Pre-trip and on-the-road meetings, readings, case studies and discussions. Tours of firms, government offices, ministries, etc; interviews of managers and government officials. Conducted in English. Passport required. The Schedule of Classes will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 2 seminars, 2 activities.

GSB 564. Entrepreneurial Finance. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 531 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

The process of financing new and fast-growing firms. Preparation of pro forma financial statements for a new venture. Readings on the venture capital process, from seed capital through the initial public offering (IPO). Valuation of firms seeking venture capital, and those planning their IPO. Valuing convertible securities. Real options valuation. 4 lectures.

GSB 569. Managing Technology in the International Legal Environment. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Practical legal decisions required to conduct business for or with high technology companies. Methods to protect high technology developments in international markets, including copyrights, patents, trade secrets, trademarks and contracts. 4 seminars.

GSB 570. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Total credit limited to 8 units. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. 1-4 seminars.

GSB 572. Distribution Packaging for Business Managers. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SU

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean of OCOB.

Physical properties of distribution packaging and equipment used in prototyping and testing of product-packaging systems and global supply chain. Application of packaging knowledge to solve distribution packaging problems in modern business, with a view towards financially efficient and environmentally sustainable solutions. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

GSB 573. Marketing Research. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing; and GSB 512 or GSE 518 or IME 503 or approval from the Associate Dean.

Preparation to become competent users and creators of marketing research information. Focus on collecting customer information as well as analyzing, interpreting and presenting information to be used in executive decision making. 4 lectures.

GSB 577. Advanced Quantitative Business Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 512 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

The necessary conceptual framework of operations research techniques for solving key problems encountered while managing an enterprise. Concepts of linear programming, simulations, network models, inventory models, PERT/CPM, and forecasting techniques. 3 seminars, 1 laboratory.

GSB 578. International Business Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Managerial concepts and techniques appropriate for analysis and decision making within international businesses. Environmental and organizational factors influencing multinational operations. Assessing international market opportunities and entry modes. Complexities of multinational management strategy, structure and systems. 4 seminars.

GSB 579. Manufacturing Strategy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 534 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Strategic role of manufacturing in the overall corporate competitive strategy. Matching manufacturing capabilities and marketing needs, capacity planning, matching process technology with product requirements. Developing flexible capabilities, central to developing and implementing an effective manufacturing strategy. 4 seminars.

GSB 583. Management of Human Resources. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

An overview of the major functional and support activities in the personnel/human resource field, including strategic human resource planning, job analysis, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal, compensation, employee rights, and employee safety and health. 4 seminars.

GSB 584. Corporate Financial Policy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 531 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

An overview of the factors that affect corporate financial decisions, including firms' financing, investment and hedging policies. Factors included: taxes, transaction costs, contracting (between managers and shareholders, and between shareholders and other claimholders such as bondholders), and asymmetric information. 3 seminars, 1 activity.

GSB 585. Investment Portfolio Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 531 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

The application of financial theory to the problems of investment management. Topics cover the valuation of basic financial instruments, portfolio optimization, risk management, asset allocation, the CAPM, and market efficiency. Required use of optimization software and writing spreadsheet programs. 4 seminars.

GSB 587. International Financial Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 531 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

The international aspects of corporate finance and investing. Balance of payments, foreign exchange with emphasis on exchange rate determination, exchange risk, hedging, and interest arbitrage, international money and capital markets, international financing, and international banking. 4 seminars.

GSB 589. Accounting Policy. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 511 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Role of management in establishing and directing accounting policy. Coverage includes the impact of management decisions on external reporting and taxes and the impact of financial reporting requirements on management decisions. 4 seminars.

GSB 595. Managing Change. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

The knowledge and the elementary skills/competencies needed to intervene in an organization in order to improve its effectiveness. Design and use of action to improve organizational effectiveness. 4 seminars.

GSB 596. Economic Forecasting. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 512, GSB 523 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Applications to business planning of selected economic forecasting techniques. Classical time series analysis, Box-Jenkins (ARIMA) models, leading indicators and input-output analysis. 3 seminars, 1 laboratory.

GSB 597. Seminar in Selected Economic Problems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSB 523 and OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Selected economic problems analyzed at an advanced level in a particular field, such as international trade, public finance, urban, industrial organization or transportation. 4 seminars.

GSE Courses

GSE 500. Independent Study. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of department head.

Advanced study planned and completed under the direction of a departmental faculty member. Open only to graduate students demonstrating ability to do independent work. Enrollment by petition. Formerly ECON 500.

GSE 510. Quantitative Methods I. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SU

Prerequisite: ECON 408 or MATH 244; and graduate standing.

Review and discussion of the basic math tools needed for graduate work in economics, including set theory, linear algebra, properties of functions, static and dynamic optimization. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 510.

GSE 511. Microeconomic Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in GSE 510 and graduate standing.

Basic microeconomic theory including theory of the firm, consumer theory, general equilibrium, capital theory, and welfare economics. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 511.

GSE 512. Macroeconomic Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: GSE 511 and graduate standing.

Basic macroeconomic theory including markets for commodities and credit, the demand for money, market-clearing and the labor market, inflation and interest rates, investment, real business cycles and unemployment, economic growth, government consumption and the role of public services, and taxes, transfers, and the public debt. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 512.

GSE 518. Quantitative Methods II. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SU

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Recommended: MATH 206 or MATH 244 or GSE 510.

Statistical concepts for use in theoretical and applied econometric applications including random variables, independence, expectations, probability, distributions, covariance and correlation, large sample theory, and properties of estimators. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 518.

GSE 520. Advanced Econometrics I. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: GSE 518 and graduate standing. Recommended: ECON 339.

The use of statistical procedures to measure theoretical economic relationships and to verify and reject theories. Advanced coverage of regression analysis and hypothesis testing. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 520.

GSE 522. Advanced Econometrics II. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: GSE 520 and graduate standing.

Use of statistical procedures to deal with simultaneous equations, limited dependent variables and time-series data. Includes methods of instrumental variables, generalized method of moments and maximum likelihood. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 522.

GSE 524. Computational Methods in Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Use of computers to solve economic problems. Topics include computer programming using econometric software, data gathering and organization, and numerical solution methods for economic problems. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 524.

GSE 526. Microeconometrics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: GSE 520 and graduate standing. Recommended: GSE 524.

Variety of standard and advanced econometric techniques employed in applied microeconomics. Emphasis on when and how to apply appropriate techniques. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 526.

GSE 532. Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSE 511 and graduate standing.

Economic analysis of pollution, congestion, public good provision, and natural resource conservation. Static and dynamic efficiency, economic growth and sustainability, pollution taxes, marketable permits, and the design of market-based regulations. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 532.

GSE 534. International Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSE 511 and graduate standing.

Analysis of the international movement of goods, services, capital and payments. The role of exchange rates, tariffs, quotas, and transport costs. Relationship between international trade and economic growth. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 534.

GSE 536. Public Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: GSE 511 and graduate standing.

Economic analysis of the rationale for public expenditure and taxation. Externalities, pollution and public policy, income redistribution and public welfare, public goods, collective choice and political institutions, public budgeting techniques and cost-benefit analysis, taxation and tax policy, state-local finance and fiscal federalism. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 536.

GSE 538. Industrial Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: GSE 511 and graduate standing.

Economic theories of industrial organization with specific reference to such topics as cartels, market concentration and performance, vertical integration, franchise contracts, ownership and control of firms, multipart and discriminatory pricing, and tie-in sales. Economic aspects of antitrust law and government regulation of industry. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 538.

GSE 542. Advanced Labor Economics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: GSE 522 and graduate standing, or consent of instructor. Recommended: GSE 526.

Research methods in labor economics and application of modern empirical techniques to the analysis of labor markets. Topics include labor supply and demand, discrimination, migration, and human capital accumulation. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 542.

GSE 544. Evidence-Based Decision Analysis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: GSE 520 and graduate standing. Recommended: GSE 524 and GSE 526.

Representing uncertainty using discrete and continuous conditional probabilities. Monte Carlo simulation of independent and correlated random variables. Optimization of decision variables. Randomization in program evaluation. Model mis-specification. Visualization and representation of the results of a decision analysis. Case studies. 4 lectures. Formerly ECON 544.

GSE 570. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics for graduate students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1-4 lectures. Formerly ECON 570.

GSE 580. Seminar in Economics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Advanced topics in economics chosen according to the common interests and needs of the students enrolled. Schedule of Classes will list topic selected. 1-4 seminars. Total credit limited to 5 units. Formerly ECON 580.

GSE 599. Thesis. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of thesis committee.

Individual research under the general supervision of the faculty, leading to a graduate thesis of suitable quality. Minimum of 8 units required for degree. Formerly ECON 599.

IT Courses

IT 137. Electrical/Electronic Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Introduction to electrical and electronic circuit fundamentals. Essential information for technical managers regarding the universal law, theory, principles, application and troubleshooting of AC and DC circuits and devices. Familiarity with concepts used extensively in manufacturing/ production and countless electronic products. Understanding of inductance, capacitance, resistance, integrated circuit components and the relationship they have with each other. Strategic decision and problem solving skills developed using electricity/electronics as the environment. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 150. Electrical and Mechanical Power Systems. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Introduction to traditional and alternative power systems. Includes power transmissions and end-use systems such as mechanical, thermal, fluid, and electrical systems with economics, safety, conservation, design and maintenance considerations. Includes introduction to electrical and electronic circuit fundamentals, essential for technical managers. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 233. Product Design with CAD. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Fundamental theory and practice of technical design communication and management of information systems. The basic application of 2-D and 3-D computer-aided design (CAD) and fundamental skills in communication of product design and their impact on the industrial organization. 2 lectures, 2 activities.

IT 260. Manufacturing Processes and Materials. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or CHEM 124 or CHEM 127.

Introduction to a wide variety of manufacturing processes and materials with emphasis on metallic products. Analysis of relationships among manufacturing processes, materials and product design. Provides experiential learning on safe and efficient operations of manufacturing equipment. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 270. Selected Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Open to undergraduate students and consent of instructor.

Directed group study of selected topics. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

IT 300. Symposium Organization. 2 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Completion of Area A or equivalent.

Managing the development of a technical information symposium from concept through symposium presentation. Organization of facilities, speakers, dinner meeting, professional meetings, industrial displays, food services, personnel, finances, and advertising. Credit/No Credit grading only. Total credit limited to 6 units. 2 seminars.

IT 303. Lean Six Sigma Green Belt. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: STAT 217, STAT 218, STAT 251, or any 300 or 400 level statistics course.

Development of a comprehensive set of skills to effectively function as a lean six sigma leader. Discussion and problem workout sessions covering the lean six sigma green belt body of knowledge including problem definition, measurement, analysis, improvement, and control, as well as the team leadership skills necessary to complete projects. 4 lectures.

IT 311. Industrial Safety and Quality Program Leadership. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: IT 150 and junior standing.

Effective program development and leadership required to implement safety and quality process improvement in industry. Application of industrial leadership, knowledge, skills and methods to develop and implement total safety and quality management programs. Class safety/quality process project includes the oral presentation. 3 lectures, 1 activity. Formerly IT 411.

IT 326. Product Design and Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: PSC 101 or completion of PHYS course in GE Area B3.

Product design and development methods with focus on user-centered design and design thinking involving basic sketching and quick prototyping techniques. Hands-on activities for different phases of new product development: identification of customer needs, concept generation/selection/testing, industrial design, design for environment, design for manufacturing, product architecture, product dissection, reverse engineering, and intellectual property. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 329. Industrial Materials. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: CHEM 110 or CHEM 111 or equivalent, and junior standing.

Structure, properties, applications and limitations of select industrial materials to include ferrous and nonferrous metals, ceramics, glasses, composites, and organic materials. Materials testing and material selection. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

IT 330. Packaging Fundamentals. 4 units

GE Area F

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: Junior standing; completion of GE Area B3 via a course in physics (PHYS), Honors Contract physics (HNRS), or physical science (PSC).

Overview of packaging. Historical development, functions, and materials. Processes and technology employed to protect goods through the supply chain. Container types, package design, development, research and testing. Economic and international importance and perspective as an industrial activity. Packaging and the environment, and laws affecting packaging. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Fulfills GE Area F.

IT 341. Packaging Polymers and Processing. 4 units

GE Area F

Term Typically Offered: F, W, SP

Prerequisite: Junior standing and completion of GE Area B3 via college level CHEM.

Physical and chemical properties of plastic materials, processing techniques, recycling, laws and regulations. Evaluation of current materials and technologies to reduce waste, improve reuse and recycling. Applied laboratory with common industry processes emphasizes relationships among processing, structure, and properties, as well as consumer interaction to specifications. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory. Fulfills GE Area F.

IT 371. Supply Chain Management in Manufacturing and Services. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F,W,SP,SU

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better, or consent of instructor, in: MATH 141 or MATH 221, and STAT 217 or STAT 218 or STAT 252 or STAT 302.

Introduction to supply chain management decision-making. Supply or value chains dealing with hard goods and services from design to daily management. Project management techniques and technology for making and implementing decisions. 4 lectures.

IT 390. Industrial Automation. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: IT 233 and IT 260.

Automated manufacturing systems, including computer numerical control (CNC), robotics, computer-integrated manufacturing, assembly and packaging. Hands-on activities in manual/automatic programming/operation of CNC machines, robots and programmable logic controllers. 2 lectures, 2 activities. Formerly IT 445.

IT 400. Special Problems for Advanced Undergraduates. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Individual investigation, research, studies, or surveys of selected problems. Total credit limited to 8 units, with a maximum of 4 units per quarter.

IT 402. Developing and Presenting New Enterprise Strategies. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: COMS 101 or COMS 102, BUS 346.

Taking a new industrial enterprise from concept to successful launch. The planning and management of a successful product-based start-up to include the integration of: product development; manufacturability and costs of production; manufacturing/outsourcing decisions; market channel selection; supply chain and distribution alternatives; inventory investment and scheduling to meet estimated demand. Successful new enterprises and application to a class project case study. Special emphasis on skills associated with developing effective technical presentations. 2 lectures, 2 activities.

IT 403. Quality Systems Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: IT 303; Business majors must have formally declared their concentration to enroll.

Quality assurance as viewed from a systems perspective that includes cost, time, and process elements. Lean thinking applied as a problem solving approach to achieve continuous process improvement through the elimination of waste and the reduction of variability. 4 lectures.

IT 406. Industrial Sales. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: BUS 346.

Development of the technical competencies required in industrial selling and purchasing through the application of value stream mapping techniques and the philosophies and tool sets encompassing the discipline of process management as it relates to sales, marketing and customer service in Industrial settings. Includes guest speakers and team-based projects with local business organizations, individual and team product presentations, with written proposals. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

IT 407. Applied Business Operations. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: IT 233, IT 260, IT 311, IT 326 and BUS 346.

An integrative experience replicating a manufacturer's business/production systems, including the design, fabrication, processing, quality control, resource management, cost-control, marketing, sales and packaging functions. Focus of instruction methodology on the development of the student's comfort with ambiguity and change inherent in business/ production systems. Builds upon the foundational concepts developed throughout the Industrial Technology curriculum. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 408. Paper and Paperboard Packaging. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: IT 330.

Physical and chemical properties, manufacture, conversion and use of paper, paperboard, corrugated board and related components. Design, use and evaluation of packages made from these materials. Survey of tests and procedures for paper based packaging materials and packaging products following ASTM, TAPPI, and ISO standards. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 409. Packaging Machinery and Processes. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: IT 330.

Integrated study of packaging machinery and processes from a practical and operational viewpoint. Understanding basic processes and interrelationship between packaging machinery and type of product, production layout and efficiency, material handling and distribution equipment, quality control and ancillary systems. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

IT 410. Operations Planning and Control. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, W

Prerequisite: BUS 391; and IT 303 or IT 341 or IT 371.

Linking supply chain operations to deliver value to the end customer. Contrasting of advanced manufacturing concepts, such as pull systems, sales and operations planning, mixed model manufacturing, level production, and theory of constraints to traditional materials requirements planning systems. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

IT 415. Supply Chain and Logistics. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: IT 303, IT 326, IT 330, IT 341, or IT 371.

Key concepts, tools, and approaches for making effective supply chain and logistics decisions in support of business goals. Practical management issues and applications are the focus rather than theoretical, mathematical optimization. Business cases and simulations are used to illustrate and explore best practices. 4 lectures.

IT 419. Cooperative Education/Internship. 1-4 units

CR/NC

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Approval of area chair, junior standing, and a CPSLO cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 without being on academic probation.

Work experience in business, industry, government and other areas of student career interest. Periodic written progress reports, final report, and evaluation by work supervisor required. Total credit limited to 4 units. Credit/No Credit grading.

IT 428. Commercialization of New Technologies. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: W, SP

Prerequisite: IT 326 or BUS 342 or BUS 346 and BUS 212 or BUS 214.

Concepts, frameworks, and experiences necessary to understand the business potential of technology innovations and determine if one or more sustainable market opportunities can be identified to exploit them. Hands-on exercises and real new inventions to illustrate concepts. 4 lectures.

IT 430. Healthcare Packaging. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: IT 330 and IT 341.

Study of packaging systems used for pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and medical devices. Characteristics and properties of materials, packaging forms, and sterilization methods. Design principles for products for healthcare environments. Includes laboratory exercises on packaging operations, materials, and evaluation methods. International and federal regulations and standards. Field trip may be required. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 435. Packaging Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: SP

Prerequisite: IT 330 and IT 341.

The development of industrial and consumer goods packaging from concept to marketplace. Interplay of package design for marketing, production and distribution. Development of the package function for optimal market and consumer performance. Case studies of domestic and international package/product successes and failures with critical examination of performance, economic and social factors. Class project for analysis and solution. 3 lectures, 1 activity.

IT 457. Radio Frequency Identification in Supply Chain Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: PHYS 121 or PHYS 122, MATH 141 or MATH 221.

An overview of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology from the managerial standpoint. Developing simple RFID solutions using development kits. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 461. Senior Project I. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: F

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems graduates must solve in their field of employment. Project results presented in a formal report, and must be completed in two quarters. Minimum 120 hours total time.

IT 462. Senior Project II. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: W

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Selection and completion of a project under faculty supervision. Projects typical of problems graduates must solve in their field of employment. Project results presented in a formal report, and must be completed in two quarters. Minimum 120 hours total time.

IT 464. Applied Industrial Technology Senior Project Seminar. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Selection and analysis of industrial and technological problems and opportunities in directed individual or group-based projects. Problems typical to those which graduates could encounter in their fields of employment. Formal report required. 4 seminars.

IT 470. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group study and seminars in selected topics in industrial technology. Open to undergraduate students. Class Schedule will list topic selected. Total credit limited to 12 units. 1 to 4 lectures.

IT 471. Selected Advanced Laboratory. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 8 units. 1 to 4 laboratories.

IT 475. Packaging Performance Testing. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: F, SP

Prerequisite: IT 330.

Survey of tests and procedures for packaging materials and packaging products following ASTM and ISTA standards. The testing procedures include tests for shock, vibration, drop and impact as prescribed for shipment by truck, rail, sea, and air. Hands-on product/packaging testing for quality control. 3 lectures, 1 laboratory.

IT 500. Individual Study. 1-6 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing and formal petition with approval from the Associate Dean.

Advanced study planned and completed under the direction of a member of the department faculty. Open only to graduate students who have demonstrated ability to do independent work. Maximum of 6 units may be applied to degree requirements.

IT 531. Lean Six Sigma Value Chain Management. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Familiarization with the Lean Six Sigma process improvement methodology and practice using Six Sigma Black Belt tools. A Six Sigma Black Belt is an individual skilled in applying basic and advanced process improvement and project management methods in order to complete projects that will result in significant, sustainable improvements within an organization. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 532. Technology Entrepreneurship. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

An understanding of the technology entrepreneurship processes by which new and innovative technologies are developed, embodied in products and/or services, brought to market, financed, and yield significant company growth. Focus on the technology startup experience, which has become a critical ingredient in national competitiveness as well as the career path of many former IT students. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 533. Industrial Processes and Materials. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Survey of emerging industrial processes and materials, and enterprise management implications of alternatives. Integrative problems such as concurrent engineering, material and process selection. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 534. Advanced Packaging Dynamics for Distribution. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

The latest technologies and techniques utilized to protect a product from common and singular distribution hazards. Distribution hazards, product fragility, cushion performance, structural package design and the ASTM, ISTA and military packaging regulations and testing protocols. Distribution environment measurement using data recorders and simulation of the captured data in a packaging dynamics lab. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 545. Advanced Product Design and Development. 4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Product design and development using current CAD modeling systems and rapid prototyping technologies. Comprehensive simulation of the product development life cycle from initial concept to completed prototype. Applications of three-dimensional modeling and rapid prototyping techniques to support product development from concept to completion. 2 lectures, 2 laboratories.

IT 570. Selected Advanced Topics. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Directed group study of selected topics for advanced students. Open to undergraduate students. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 16 units. 1-4 seminars.

IT 571. Selected Advanced Topics Laboratory. 1-4 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Directed group laboratory study of selected topics for advanced students. The Schedule of Classes will list title selected. Total credit limited to 16 units. 1-4 laboratories.

IT 591. Applied Industry Project I. 2 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Initiation, completion and presentation of an individual project, involving research, allowing an opportunity to apply knowledge, skills, and competencies to address a significant business issue in the field of industrial technology, preferably in connection with the student's employment. As part of IT 591 a formal written project proposal must be accepted and approved by the Industrial Technology Area Chair before work begins.

IT 592. Applied Industry Project II. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Initiation, completion and presentation of an individual project, involving research, allowing an opportunity to apply knowledge, skills, and competencies to address a significant business issue in the field of industrial technology, preferably in connection with the student's employment. As part of IT 591 a formal written project proposal must be accepted and approved by the Industrial Technology Area Chair before work begins.

IT 594. Business and Technology Project I. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Master of Science in Business and Technology program or approval from the Associate Dean.

Development of a comprehensive applied research project proposal, including problem statement, literature review, questions and hypotheses, research design and methodology, procedures, research sample, proposed data collection and analyses. The project proposal must be accepted and approved by the Industrial Technology Area Chair.

IT 595. Business and Technology Project II. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite or corequisite: Satisfactory completion of IT 594 and Graduate standing in the Master of Science in Business and Technology program or approval from the Associate Dean.

Execution of the comprehensive applied research project proposal developed in IT 594. Included by illustration: securing a study sample, developing data collection instruments and procedures, completing data collection, and preparing the project data set for statistical or qualitative analyses.

IT 596. Business and Technology Project III. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite or corequisite: Satisfactory completion of IT 595 and Graduate standing in the Master of Science in Business and Technology program or approval from the Associate Dean.

Completion of the applied research project executed in IT 595. Included by illustration: final analyses, developing data displays, writing the final discussion chapter, editing project report and making an oral presentation to IT faculty.

IT 599. Industrial and Technical Studies Thesis. 3 units

Term Typically Offered: TBD

Prerequisite: OCOB graduate standing or approval from the Associate Dean.

Completion of a thesis involving individual research that is significant to the field of industrial and technical systems. A formal written proposal must be accepted by the Associate Dean of OCOB Graduate Programs before work begins. Course satisfies culminating experience requirement through the completion of the comprehensive thesis. Total credit limited to 9 units.

Accounting

Douglas C. Cerf
B.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1978; M.A., University of California, Davis, 1987; Ph.D., 1991.

Lee B. Burgunder
B.A., Dartmouth College, 1977; M.B.A., Stanford University, 1981; J.D., 1981.

Chris A. Carr
B.A., University of Nebraska, 1987; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles, 1998; J.D., Santa Clara University, 1990.

Li Dang
Ph.D., Drexel University, 2004.

Herb Hunt
B.A., University of Vermont, 1974; M.B.A., University of Vermont, 1978; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder, 1982.

Charles (Tad) R. Miller
B.A., College of Wooster, 1970; M.B.A., University of Arizona, 1980; Ph.D., 1987. Certified Public Accountant.

Steven Mintz
B.S., Long Island University, 1967; M.B.A., Syracuse University, 1969; D.B.A., George Washington University, 1978.

Rodney Mock
J.D., University of Oregon School of Law, 2002; L.L.M., University of Washington School of Law, 2004.

Jeffrey Tolin
B.S., New York University, 1971; J.D., Brooklyn Law School, 1975; LL.M., New York University, 1981.

Kimberly Westermann Cole
B.S., Cal Poly University, 2000; Ph.D., Bentley University, 2011.

Economics

Stephen Hamilton
B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara, 1991; M.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1994; Ph.D., 1996.

Matthew Cole
B.S., University of Northern Iowa, 2001; M.S., University of Northern Iowa, 2003; Ph.D., University of Oregon, 2009.

Jaqueline Doremus
B.S., Stanford University, 2004; M.A., University of Michigan, 2010; Ph.D., University of Michigan 2015.

Stefanie Fischer
B.S., Linfield College, 2005; M.A., Montana State University, 2009; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2015.

Eric Fisher
M.A., John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, 1979; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1985.

Carlos A. Flores
B.A., Monterey Institute of Technology, Mexico, 1998; M.A., UC Berkeley, 2003; Ph.D., UC Berkeley, 2005.

Jonathan James
B.A., UCLA, 2003; M.A., Duke University, 2007; Ph.D., Duke University, 2011.

Jason Lepore
B.A., University of California, Irvine, 2002; M.A., University of California, Davis, 2003; Ph.D., 2007.

Michael L. Marlow
B.A., George Washington University, 1975; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 1978.

Aric Shafran
B.S., Cornell University, 1999; M.A., University of Colorado, 2003; Ph.D., 2007.

Daniel J. Villegas
B.S., University of Southern California, Los Angeles, 1972; A.M., Stanford University, 1975; Ph.D., 1979.

Eduardo Zambrano
B.A., Universidad Católica Andrés Bello, Venezuela, 1993; M.A., Cornell University, 1998; Ph.D., Cornell University, 1999.

Finance

John Dobson
B.A., University of Lancaster, England, 1979; M.A., University of South Carolina, 1981; Ph.D., 1988.

Bing Anderson
B.Engr., University of Science and Technology of China, 1993; M.A., University of Chicago, 1996; M.S., Stanford University, 2000; Ph.D., 2002.

Brian Ayash
B.S., Clarkson University; MBA, University of Rochester; M.S. University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.

Ziemowit K. Bednarek
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 2010.

Garland B. Durham
B.S., University of Kentucky, 1983; M.S., University of Illinois, 1985; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, 2001.

Larry R. Gorman
B.S., Washington State University, 1985; M.B.A., Western Washington University, 1988; Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1998.

Pratish A. Patel
B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology, 2002; M.S., UC Berkeley, 2005; Ph.D., UC Berkeley, 2013.

Cyrus A. Ramezani
B.A., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1984; M.S., 1988; M.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1991; Ph.D., 1992.

Mahdi Rastad
M.S., University of Illinois Urbana Campus 2009; Ph.D., University of Illinois Urbana Campus, 2012

Industrial Technology and Packaging

Eric Olsen
B.S., University of Maine at Orono, 1979; M.B.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1987; Ph.D., The Ohio State University, 2004.

Ahmed Deif
B.S., American University, Cairo, 1999; M.A.Sc, University of Windsor, Canada, 2003; Ph.D., University of Windsor, Canada, 2006.

Manocher Djassemi
B.S., University of Science and Technology, Tehran, 1977; M.S., University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, 1990; Ph.D., 1994.

Koushik Saha
B.S., G.B. Pant University, India, 1998; M.S., University of Florida, 2001; M.S., Michigan State University, 2005; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 2010

Jagjit (Jay) Singh
B.S., Poona University, Pune, India, 1992; M.S., Michigan State University, 1998; Ph.D., 2002.

Jonathan York
B.A., Yale University, 1973; M.A., Michigan State University, 1976; Ph.D., 1979.

Javier de la Fuente
B.S., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1998; M.S., Michigan State University, 2006; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 2013.

Ajay Kathuria
B.S., GJUST, India, 2002; M.S., Michigan State University, 2007; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 2013.

Management, HR, and Information Systems

James Sena
B.S., Xavier University of Ohio, 1961; M.B.A., 1964; M.S., University of Dayton, 1968; D.B.A., University of Kentucky, 1972.

Benjamin Alexander
B.S., Tufts University, 2005; M.A., George Mason University, 2009; Ph.D., Tulane University.

James Burleson
B.B.A., Baylor University; M.B.A., Auburn University.

Leida Chen
M.B.A.,University of Central Arkansas, 1996; Ph.D., University of Memphis, 2000.

Jean-Francois Axel Hugues Coget
M.B.A., HEC School of Management, Paris, France, 1998; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2004.

Patricia Dahm
B.S., University of Notre Dame; M.B.A., University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.

Rebecca Ellis
B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1969; M.A., 1971; M.S., 1981; Ph.D. 1984.

Barry Floyd
B.S., Michigan State University, 1973; M.S., 1974; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1983; Ph.D., 1985.

Bruce Greenbaum
B.S., University of Virginia, 1991; M.B.A., University of Michigan, 1996; Ph.D., University of Texas, 2013.

Kenneth A. Griggs
B.A., University of Maryland, 1972; M.S., 1975; M.B.A., 1979; Ph.D., 1989.

Patricia McQuaid
B.S., Case-Western Reserve University, 1978; M.B.A., Eastern Michigan University, 1982; M.S., Auburn University, 1988; Ph.D., Auburn University, 1996.

William R. Pendergast
B.A., University of Notre Dame, 1966; M.A., Columbia University, 1968; Ph.D., 1971.

Joachim Scholz
M.A., FH Nordakademie, Germany, 2004; M.Sc., University of Exeter, UK, 2007; Ph.D., Queen's University, Canada, 2014.

Taryn Stanko
B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.B.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of California, Irvine.

Christopher Douglas Zatzick
Ph.D., University of California, Irvine, 2001

Marketing

Norm A. Borin
B.S., University of California, Davis, 1981; M.B.A., California State University, Sacramento, 1987; Ph.D., University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1992.

Jeffrey E. Danes
B.A., San Jose State University, 1972; M.A., 1974; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1976.

Brennan Davis
B.S. University of California, Los Angeles, 1992; M.B.A. University of Pennsylvania, 2003; Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, 2008

Jeffrey Hess
B.A., Biola University, 1986; M.B.A., Pepperdine, 1988; Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder, 1998.

Joan M. Lindsey-Mulliken
B.S., University of Missouri, 1983; M.B.A., University of Arizona, 1996; Ph.D., 1999.

Lynn E. Metcalf
B.A., University of Oregon, 1978; M.I.M., American Graduate School of International Management, 1981; Ph.D., University of South Carolina, 1986.

Stern Neill
B.A., Louisiana State University, 1992; M.B.A., Southeastern Louisiana University, 1994; Ph.D., Louisiana State University, 2000.